From the monthly archives: "January 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Epias muscosa?
Geographic location of the bug:  La Merced, Chanchamayo Province, Junin, Peru
Date: 01/30/2019
Time: 09:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have several images of various moths from a trip near La Merced, Peru for blacklighting. This first one is the easiest as I’m near certain it is Epias muscosa – it is always good to get consensus though.
Thanks in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin

American Silkworm Moth

Dear Kevin,
Your images are beautiful with many fine details, and except for what we believe is a spelling error, we agree with your identification that this is an American Silkworm Moth,
Epia muscosa, which is pictured on iNaturalist and Encyclopedia of Life, and FlickR has many nice images of living specimens.  The bushy antennae indicate that your individual is a male.

American Silkworm Moth

Many, many thanks!
And yes, I meant to spell the genus as Epia.
Might I float one more image in your direction?
Thanks again!
Kevin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  New Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Isla Bastimentos, Panama
Date: 01/29/2019
Time: 04:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the Bugman:  Julien found it in a cave in Panama!  🙂 (he was already deceased) xo
Jesse Kamm

Tailless Whipscorpion

Hi Neighbor,
This is a harmless Tailless Whipscorpion, a shy predator that prefers the dark, hence its presence in the cave.  It is our understanding that Cancle is a common name used in some Spanish speaking countries for the Tailless Whipscorpion.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Bayswater, Western Australia
Date: 01/28/2019
Time: 03:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would like to know if can assist me with identifying this insect please
How you want your letter signed:  With ink

Mole Cricket

Our identification requests for Mole Crickets come from many places on the planet, not just Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subjec:  Who is she?
Geographic location of the bug:  Townsville, QLD
Date: 01/28/2019
Time: 12:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Today I met this fashionable individual while taking shelter from the summer rain. Do you know their name?
How you want your letter signed:  Gabby

Grapevine Moth

Dear Gabby,
This is a Grapevine Moth and we identified it on Butterfly House where it is classified in the subfamily Agaristinae, called Day Flying Moths or Whistling Moths, in the family Noctuidae, the Owlet Moth.  According to Butterfly House:  “The adult is a day-flying moth, with a wingspan of up to 5 cm. The wings are black with striking white bands on the forewings, and a white outer margin on the hindwings. The abdomen is black on top and has orange stripes underneath.  The body has tufts of bright red hair on the tip of the abdomen, and at the bases of the legs. These red hairs project and are visible from above. The adults are gregarious, feed on nectar and live for 2-3 weeks. They had a characteristic fluttering flight and can ascend to 25 m or more. Their overall sex ratio is about 1:1. The adult males have anterior brush organs on which are secreted chemicals thought to be pheromones.”  There is a nice image on Alamy and according to Project Noah:  “A Noctuid moth endemic to the south-eastern part of Australia and is now an invasive species in many other parts of the world. In 1862 the Indian Myna (
Acridotheres tristis) was introduced into Australia to control the Grapevine Moth. The bird is now considered a pest and Grapvine moths are common. I watched a female for ten minutes – first seeking the location of a vine – second happy she was near one she just started releasing eggs; one every 30 seconds while fluttering her wings – third the eggs just fell to the ground around the base of the vine. Over the next few days I noticed scores of tiny caterpillars climbing slowly up the supporting posts. Near enough was good enough I guess.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug
Geographic location of the bug:  arrived on boat, Caribbean somewhere between Trinidad and Martinique, think it flew on board
Date: 01/26/2019
Time: 11:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looks like a Jeruselem Cricket but has wings.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Mole Cricket

Dear Chris,
This is a wonderful image of a Mole Cricket, a primarily subterranean dweller that is found in many parts of the world.  Some species are capable of flight.  We have even had folks claim they can swim.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bristle Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mittagong NSW
Date: 01/26/2019
Time: 10:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this today. Is it a Bristle Fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks and regards, Paul

Tachinid Fly

Dear Paul,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, and members of this family are sometimes called Bristle Flies in Australia, but we are not entirely certain if that name is used for the entire family or just a few species, like
Amphibolia vidua which is represented on our site under the common name Bristle Fly.  We believe your individual is a different species, possibly Formosia speciosa, which is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination