From the yearly archives: "2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Aransas Texas
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please help identify this bug found in beach house in Port Aransas Texas? There have been two. They are tiny maybe 1-1.5mm in size. Looks like browns in color with some white on one of the heads and second segment then the second hug has white on its second segment too. They look kinda lost not quick to move. Kinda look like some kind of weevil maybe?
How you want your letter signed:  Melody Volz

Minute Brown Scavenger Beetle

Dear Melody,
This is a very tiny Beetle.  Thanks so much for including the human finger for scale.  We have attempted an identification for you, but we still do not have an answer.  We are confident this is NOT a Weevil.  We will attempt to contact some Beetle experts and others who might be able to provide an identification, and perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.

Minute Brown Scavenger Beetle

Arthur V. Evans responds
Daniel,
This is in the family Latridiidae, possibly in the genus Dienerella. These beetles occur in damp, moldy situations in buildings.
All the best, ART
Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.
Research Collaborator, Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Minute Brown Scavenger Beetle

Ed. Note:  According to BugGuide  the habitat is “rotting vegetable matter; some species live in houses on damp wallpaper, moldy bread, etc. or otherwise associated with stored products” and they feed on “fungal tissues (slime molds, molds, mildew, spores of “higher” fungi).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug spotted while camping
Geographic location of the bug:  Naked Falls on the Washougal river
Date: 07/22/2019
Time: 11:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, when this bug landed on my bag I was intrigued. Growing up here I have never seen one like it and google image search is not giving me any results. Just curious about it if you have the time. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Loni Lane

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Loni,
We believe we have correctly identified this impressive, predatory Robber Fly as
Laphria columbica, one of the Bee-Like Robber Flies based on BugGuide images.

Wow!! That was so fast!! Thank you so much!! This was Washington state by the way. I realized I forgot that part in my original email
Thank you so much!
Loni Lane
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Mapumalanga south africa
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 12:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please id the catepillar
How you want your letter signed:  Normal

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar:  Nudaurelia wahlbergi

Based on identifications we have made in the past, we are confident this Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar is Nudaurelia wahlbergi.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus OH, central
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 12:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy while landscaping, was on the ground in some clover weeds. July 18th 2019, 93 degree weather
How you want your letter signed:  Anthony C

Questionmark Caterpillar

Dear Anthony,
This is the caterpillar of a Brush Footed Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  Based on this and other BugGuide images, we are pretty confident this is a Questionmark Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth with impressive camouflage
Geographic location of the bug:  CT
Date: 07/14/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this beautiful fellow in our mudroom. He has tree bark or dead leaf like camouflage. What is he/she? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jenn,
This impressive moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on its hidden hindwings lack pupils.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Caterpillar Eating Petunias
Geographic location of the bug:  Kansas
Date: 07/18/2019
Time: 08:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve seen this caterpillar eating the petunias. I googled but was unsuccessful identifying the species. Your help is appreciated.
Sincerely,
How you want your letter signed:  Anna

Common Buckeye Caterpillar

Dear Anna,
We tried to identify your caterpillar this weekend, but we were having trouble accessing BugGuide.  We know this is a Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillar in the family Nymphalidae, but we needed to determine the species.  We located this identical caterpillar on BugGuide, but alas, it is only identified to the family level.  This BugGuide image leads us to believe you encountered a Common Buckeye Caterpillar.  BugGuide lists host plants as “Plants from the snapdragon family including snapdragon (
Antirrhinum), toadflax (Linaria), and Gerardia; the plantain family including plantains (Plantago); and the acanthus family including ruellia (Ruellia nodiflora).”  Butterfly Fun Facts lists Mexican Petunia (Ruellia species) as a host plant.

Common Buckeye Caterpillar

Daniel,
From your resources and referring back to the caterpillar I concur it looks like a Common Buckeye Caterpillar.
I greatly appreciate your assistance.  Wishing you a wonderful day!
Anna
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination