From the monthly archives: "October 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black bug with stripe
Geographic location of the bug:  Table Mountain, South Africa
Date: 10/20/2018
Time: 04:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello all,
I came across this bug while climbing table mountain in south africa. Does anyone know what it is?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Joe

Tok-Tokkie

Dear Joe,
This looks like one of the South African Darkling Beetles in the genus
 Psammodes known as Tok-Tokkies, but the stripe is something we have not seen, so we will attempt a species identification for you.

Update:  October 29, 2018
Thanks to a comment from Emily, we now realize the stripe is actually a blurry blade of grass.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery bug in great numbers
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 10/21/2018
Time: 02:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These mystery bugs have been found in great numbers in our backyard and behind our fence in a wetland. They don’t fly but crawl all over the place and only appeared after Hurricane Harvey flooded our whole area very badly for an extended time.
The chickens won’t eat them at all, unfortunately. I can’t find them anywhere on the web. Not sure if we should try to eradicate them or if they are harmless.
How you want your letter signed:  KK Rush

Bordered Plant Bugs

Dear KK Rush,
These appear to be Bordered Plant Bugs,
Largus bipustulatus, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “ground-dwelling or associated with the vegetative parts of forbs, shrubs and trees.”

Thank you so much! I swear I dug around all through the ‘net.
I sure wish the chickens would eat them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subjec:  Deadly kissing bug?!?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Washington State
Date: 10/20/2018
Time: 05:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have been seeing these more frequently and found one in my house this evening. Is this the dangerous kissing bug, or something else?
Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  A nervous Nelly

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear A nervous Nelly,
This is a native Western Conifer Seed Bug, not a Kissing Bug.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug has greatly increased its range beginning in the 1960s when it began to be reported outside of the Pacific Northwest.  It now frequently enters homes to hibernate in the northeast and beginning in the early 2000s it has been reported in Europe as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis in SE Michigan
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Michigan
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These (2) are in my yard.  The immediate area is a vernal marsh area, with swamp milkweed.  They are not on the milkweed, but it is close by.
How you want your letter signed:  Bill Jones

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis

Dear Bill,
Physically, this appears to be a Monarch chrysalis, however the color is not normal.  A normal Monarch chrysalis is bright green with gold flecks, and as it nears the time for the adult to emerge, the orange wings appears through the exoskeleton.  Your chrysalis appears to have fallen prey to a parasite, probably a Tachinid Fly like the chrysalis pictured on Monarch Lover

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Toxic milkweed cricket or not?
Geographic location of the bug:  KwaZulu Natal South Africa
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 12:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Confirmation it’s a Toxic milkweed cricket and is it a female (big one) and two males (smaller ones)
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Bill,
These are indeed mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae and we believe the species is
Phymateus leprosus.  Females are the larger individuals in the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and orange wings
Geographic location of the bug:  Orlando FL
Date: 10/18/2018
Time: 10:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was watering part of a community garden when I noticed this bright, beautiful insect. Is it a banded net-wing  beetle? Seems more fly-like.
How you want your letter signed:  Mandy

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Mandy,
This is a Large Milkweed Bug and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  When milkweed is not available, Large Milkweed Bugs have been reported on oleander, another plant with a toxic milky sap.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination