From the monthly archives: "September 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  black/green striped beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Walla Walla, WA
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 09:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, we found this inch-long beetle on a lemongrass plant in our yard.  It’s not in any of our guidebooks.  What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Beetle-befuddled

Locust Borer

Dear Beetle-befuddled,
This is a Locust Borer, and if your guidebooks are Pacific Northwest local, and not published very recently, they probably don’t include this distinctive beetle because it has recently expanded its range of eastern North America because of the cultivation of its host tree, the black locust.  According to BugGuide:  “Previously confined to the native range of Black Locust in the northeast, it has spread with the trees throughout the US and parts of Canada. Black Locust is used for reclamation and similar projects where trees are likely to be stressed and thus more vulnerable to damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cute picture
Geographic location of the bug:  westchester county new york
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 10:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen this before and although I have extremely limited affection for slugs I had to take a picture
How you want your letter signed:  Don Erwin

Mating Slugs

Dear Don,
Your image of mating Slugs is quite stunning.  If you would like to read more about hermaphroditic mating Slugs, the Wildlife Kate blog has a nice posting that states:  “I returned a little later to see just one slug…. and no sign of the jelly, which I had presumed was some kind of slime in which the eggs were fertilised. I was wrong! On doing a little research, I discovered that this blob of jelly was in fact two slug penises, entwined! Slugs are hermaphrodite and they impregnate each other through this method and then retract their penises, laying eggs a couple of weeks later.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Denver Colorado
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 05:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what kind of bug this is? I’m 99% sure it is a caterpillar, but can’t find a similar one online. It is definitely a creature of some sort, it moved when I tried to pick it up.
How you want your letter signed:  Robin

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Robin,
This is a third instar Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar, and here is a matching image from BugGuide.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “L3: At this stage, the larvae look quite different. The long straight horn now curves and looks strikingly similar to a
Parthenocissus quinquefolia tendril. The larvae can be yellowish, green, brownish or reddish with 5 white eyespots around the spiracles on the sides of the larvae.”  Your individual has not yet shed its caudal horn.

Correction:  Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar
Thanks to a correction from frequent WTB? contributor Bostjan Dvorak, we acknowledge our initial mistake.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange winged beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Raleigh, NC
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 12:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug is stuck between my window and screen. Nocturnal? Difficult to get a photo. Looked like a black beetle until he opened his wings.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in NC

Dung Beetle

Dear Curious in NC,
This is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, and it really resembles this member of the genus
Geotrupes pictured on BugGuide.  They are often called Dung Beetles.

Daniel,
Thank you! It was fascinating to watch him. I appreciate the information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern NC
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 09:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I live in Eastern NC about an hour from the coast. saw this bug on my horse fence after Hurricane Flo blew through. Any idea?
How you want your letter signed:  AH

Wheel Bug

Dear AH,
While weather events like Hurricane Florence have been known to blow exotic insects to distant lands, potentially increasing their range, this Wheel Bug is a native species for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Banded Glowworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Wyoming, Michigan
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 10:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Last night I took a video of a Glowworm I found in my garage. I had mowed my lawn previous to finding it and leaf blew some clippings around. I’m assuming that’s how it ended up there. Here are some screenshots from said video. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Aron Adamczyk

Glowworm Glowing

Dear Aron,
We believe your Glowworm is in the genus
Phengodes based on your location and this BugGuide image.  We were able to increase the highlights in the dark image you submitted which enhances the glow.

Glowworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination