From the monthly archives: "September 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this egg on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 07:32 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest time is fast approaching, and I am inspecting my colas for dreaded Budworms, and I have learned to recognize their eggs, but I noticed a few different eggs I would like identified.  They are on a stalk.
Thanks for your time.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Lacewing Egg

Dear Constant Gardener,
We suspect we will get a few comments from our readers regarding the content of your image, but the stalked egg in the lower left corner was laid by a Green Lacewing.  Green Lacewings are predators, and their larvae are commonly called Aphid Wolves.

Mel Frank Comments
Yes, they are all over my plants, every year. It’s one of the reasons I have had only very minor insect infestations and is a main reason I don’t use insecticides–I don’t want to kill the biological helpers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Ocala, Florida
Date: 09/21/2018
Time: 09:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this insect on the outside of our screened lanai.  Any help in identifying it would be greatly appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Nan

Conehead

Dear Nan,
This is a Short-Winged Conehead Katydid in the genus
Belocephalus, and here is a BugGuide image for verification.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually associated with small palms, including saw and cabbage palmettos” and “Has been observed eating palm fronds.”   The ovipositor indicates your individual is female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some kind of biting fly or wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Simi Valley, CA
Date: 09/20/2018
Time: 08:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
This bug landed on and bit my 7 year old. Can you please help identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Terry Jenkin

Corsair

Dear Terry,
Though it is not considered dangerous, the bite of this Assassin Bug,
Rasahus hamatus, commonly called a Corsair, is reported to be quite painful, and the Corsair is also one of the members of the Assassin Bug family that seems to bite without being provoked.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmington, Delaware
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 11:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  When recharging my electric vehicle, I found a swarm of these insects on the handle of the charging station.  They appear some sort of ant and as it started to rain, they grouped together into a tight formation.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Delaware

Probably Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Dear Curious in Delaware,
These are hatchling True Bugs and we suspect they are in the Leaf Footed Bug family Coreidae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nova Scotia , Canada
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 09:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My dad snapped a pic if a beetle. I’m trying to figure out the name of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Scott

Sugar Maple Borer

Dear Scott,
This beautiful beetle is a Sugar Maple Borer and they are not very common.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Locust Borer
Geographic location of the bug:  Benton Harbor, MI
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 05:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I know you already have a lot of locust borer pictures, but thought, since your description in one of the pictures starts with “Adult Locust Borers are often found on goldenrod in the autumn”, you would like to see this shot of one sitting in the goldenrod we spotted while we were out walking the dogs….
How you want your letter signed:  pat

Locust Borer

Dear Pat,
We love your image of a Locust Borer on goldenrod and we are thrilled to post it, especially as we just posted another image of a Locust Borer from Washington state, not part of its native range, an expansion made possible because of the cultivation of black locust trees for landscaping and other reasons.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination