From the monthly archives: "September 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Chennai India
Date: 09/25/2018
Time: 04:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Burpidae???  Friend sighted on a tree in Marina Beach area of Tamil Nadu India on Sept 1, 2018
How you want your letter signed:  Ranger Bert

Jewel Beetle

Dear Ranger Bert,
We believe you have misspelled the family in question.  This is a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and we wish there was a dorsal view that clearly shows the elytra.  The first matching image we located was on Shutterstock where it is identified as “possibly
Sternocera nitens or S. Brahmina [sic].”  We found a different image on Alamy with an identical identification, but alas, no other verifiable images in our quick search.  Mounted specimens are pictured on Coleopsoc.

Jewel Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Polyphemus moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Seattle
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 11:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugma:  Hi – I Found a polyphemus caterpillar in the mail box(!?) and transferred it to an observation tank placed in a classroom.  I provided pin oak leaves and the caterpillar has spun a cocoon.  One website said the cocoon needs to over-winter in a cool place and will emerge in June.  Another website said it will emerge in a couple of weeks.  I would love for this marvelous creature to be able to survive and emerge  – any suggestions?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Candace Robbins

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear Candace,
This is indeed a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar.  Overwintering in a cool place is excellent advice, but the June emergence is probably information for a location with a cold winter.  According to BugGuide:  “In southern United States, adults fly April–May and July–August (2 broods); in northern part of range, adults fly from May to July (1 brood).”  BugGuide lists Washington sightings from April to October, which leads us to believe you may have two generations, so emergence might happen well before June, possibly even in several weeks.  We just located information that disputes that supposition, because according to Pacific Northwest Moths:  “Our populations are most likely single-brooded with capture dates from mid-April until August.  Second-brooded populations exist in areas with warmer climates.”  You might be able to witness eclosion in April.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carolina Wolf Spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Denver, Colorado
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 12:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
This big guy has been hanging out in our well for two days now. He is about 2-3 inches in length (a little longer than a sharpie pen cap). He seems very large for a Colorado spider, largest I’ve seen in years! He’s mostly grey on top with black markings (black X on abdomen); on bottom he is black and grey banded. He’s also got some cool gold/orange fangs! Also seems like his markings have changed from picture 2 to 3. Pictures were taken day apart, second day about 10 degrees cooler. The only spider I can figure it is is a form of a wolf spider.. what do you think? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  To Sarah,

Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear Sarah,
We agree that this certainly looks like a Carolina Wolf Spider which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the ‘knees’ ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and that is exactly what your ventral view illustrates.

Carolina Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge bee
Geographic location of the bug:  North Florida
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This large bee thing buzzed my position.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurtz

Southern Bee Killer

Dear Kurtz,
This is not a Bee.  It is a Southern Bee Killer,
Mallophora orcina, or another member of the genus, and it is pictured on BugGuide.  It is a predatory Robber Fly that mimics a large Bee and that feeds primarily on Bees and Wasps as well as other large flying insects.  Based on data for BugGuide sightings, this is a late season sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird creature found at my school
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Kentucky
Date: 09/23/2018
Time: 01:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I recently found what resembles a bug in my university’s shower and I would love to know what type of insect it is, or if it is even an insect.
How you want your letter signed:  A concerned student

Thing found in University Shower

Dear Concerned Student,
We do not want to speculate on the possible number of things that might come off of or out of a university student’s body in a communal shower only to be left behind for the next person to discover, but we can say for certain this is not an insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid from Panama
Geographic location of the bug:  Anton Valley, Panama, 600m absl
Date: 09/23/2018
Time: 08:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I never found what could be this katydid (even the genus is unknown to me), so any help would be much appreciated ! Thanks in advance 🙂 Frank
How you want your letter signed:  Frank Canon

Katydid

Dear Frank,
Your images are gorgeous and this Katydid is quite unusual.  The undeveloped wings lead us to believe it is immature, and the apparent lack of an ovipositor indicates it is a male.  We haven’t the time this morning to conduct a thorough identification search, so we are posting your images as unidentified and we will return to this posting this evening.  Meanwhile, perhaps our readership has a moment or two for research.

Katydid

Hello Daniel,
Thanks for your fast answer, actually it looks like a nymph of Steirodon (?), but I can’t find anything like this on the web…
Btw I have identified another katydid found in Panama (Panacanthus spinosus) and no picture exists on the web, only a dead collected specimen.
I’ve been told by a specialist that I also found a new species of stick insect (Trychopeplus sp.), so there are many new insects to describe in this great country !
Cheers,
Frank
Thanks for the response Frank.  Cesar Crash has also suggested possibly Nicklephyllum acanthonotum https://zenodo.org/record/205813#.W6ltZUCJKM8 and we agree that does look similar, and it is a much better match than Steirodon which is pictured on Project Noah.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can confirm.
Hi Daniel,
Yes, it is definitely S. acanthonotum. A really gorgeous creature!
Piotr
Ed. Note:  We wrote back to Piotr to find out why he agreed with the identification of Nicklephyllum acanthonotum, but referred to it as S. acanthonotum, and then we located this Novataxa page that states:  “The tribe of the giant katydids Steirodontini is reviewed, its relationship with other groups of Phaneropterinae from the Old and New World is discussed, and an updated key to genera is presented. Nicklephyllum n. gen.is established to accommodate one species described as Stilpnochlora acanthonotum Nickle, 1985 from Colombia.”
Piotr Naskrecki explains naming convention:  Old habits die hard – this species was originally described as Stilpnochlora acanthonotum (by Dave Nickle, later renamed in his honor) and I still think of it as such.
P
Update:  October 5, 2018
Hi Daniel,

Many thanks for your answer and sorry for my late reply but I was abroad.
Actually, it looks like Nicklephyllum rather than Steirodon ! I think it is probably something into this genus, regarding the shape of the pronotum…
Thanks again for your help, much appreciated !
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination