From the monthly archives: "July 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gold leaf beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Saba, Caribbean Netherlands
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 10:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This lovely was resting on a water hyacinth in my garden. The iPhone pic doesn’t do its color justice – it was a bright metallic gold.  I’m guessing it’s a leaf or a tortoise beetle, but I haven’t been able to find any matches online.  Any ideas?
(Plus, it’s a really cool photo and I wanted to share it.)
How you want your letter signed:  drsunsets

Tortoise Beetle, we believe

Dear dr sunsets,
This is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, and we believe it is a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini, but we didn’t read your submission that carefully, and we thought you took this image in The Netherlands, so we did not find any matching images.  We will attempt a new search of Caribbean species.  A quick search turned up no matches.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Wow, thanks so much for your quick reply!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect picture to identify…
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Date: 07/29/2018
Time: 12:40 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is it?  Front and side view images attached. Interesting picture, but we don’t know what it is.  July in Ohio.  The deck screw in the picture for reference of size is a #2 Phillips exterior deck screw from Lowe’s.
How you want your letter signed:  Greg

Hanging Thief

Dear Greg,
This magnificent predator is a predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, commonly called a Hanging Thief, because after catching its prey, often large stinging insects like Wasps, while flying, it will frequently hang from one leg while dining.

Hanging Thief

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sphinx Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Mississippi
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 10:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me and the kids identify this moth!  Possibly a Pandorus Sphinx?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Scott

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Scott,
You are absolutely correct.  This beautiful moth is a Pandorus Sphinx.

Dan,
Thank you so much for the very fast response!  What a beautiful and fascinating creature this is!!
Sincerely,
Scott
Brandon, Mississippi

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Curious big-eyed cricket
Geographic location of the bug:  South-West Costa Rica
Date: 07/29/2018
Time: 09:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Mr. Bugman. I am a recently graduated biologist, but insects have never been my strongest part 😛 My father spotted this curious cricket in the SW area of Costa Rica. As you can see, it has an interesting color pattern. I am deeply intrigued by its eyes.
Any help will be much appreciated
How you want your letter signed:  A Biologist in the Making

Taeniophora valleana

Dear Biologist in the Making,
This is a very colorful Grasshopper, not a Cricket, but both Grasshoppers and Crickets are classified together in the order Orthoptera.  We believe we have correctly identified your Grasshopper as
Taeniophora valleana thanks to this FlickR posting.  Here are additional FlickR images.

Taeniophora valleana

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beach bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape cod ocean beach
Date: 07/29/2018
Time: 03:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this crazy thing?
How you want your letter signed:  Keyes fam

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Keyes fam,
We especially love your aerial or dorsal view of this Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar because it shows how effectively the caudal bump resembles an eye, making this harmless caterpillar take on the appearance of a threatening snake, at least to birds or other predators that might find this fat, mature caterpillar to be a toothsome feast.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Immature larvae have the characteristic horn-like tail which drops off (i.e., does not develop) after the fourth instar.  Feeding lasts for three to four weeks and full grown larvae leave the host to pupate in undeground [sic] burrows.”  The big mystery to us is how it ended up on the beach.  Perhaps a nearby garden is growing grapes or another preferred food plant and it left the plant to pupate, when it was snatched by a bird that began to carry it over the sand.  The caterpillar then thrashed about and perhaps the false eye startled the bird and it dropped dinner in the dunes.

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

This is great! Thank you very much. We were surprised by the size, color, and that it was on the beach. Our theory was also that a bird may have dropped it there. We appreciate your help with the identification!
Oh, we have another question. What are the white squiggly things that run the length on each side? And do they serve a purpose? Thank you!!!!!
The markings on the side may help camouflage the caterpillar while it is feeding in dappled light.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Guapiles, Costa Rica
Date: 07/29/2018
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Please help me to identify this 2 dragonflies.
How you want your letter signed:  Johannes

Damselfly

Dear Johannes,
These are not Dragonflies, but they are Damselflies from the suborder Zygoptera, and Dragonflies are in a different suborder but within the same order Odonata.  The Damselfly with the red markings looks like a 
Hetaerina sp. pictured on Costa Rican Dragonflies and Damselflies. and it looks like a Occisa Rubyspot from Belize we have in our archives. We are uncertain about your other individual.

Damselfly

Damselfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination