From the monthly archives: "May 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beneficial or pest
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 05/13/2018
Time: 11:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Its May and I’ve seen this bug on my black eyed Susan and also on basil, tough I cannot see any leaf damage. It seems just to be resting on leaves and flowers but not actively eating leaf nor bug. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Omar

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Dear Omar,
This is a Tumbling Flower Beetle in the family Mordellidae and based on this BugGuide image, we are confident the species is
Mordella knulli.  Of the family, BugGuide states:  “Larvae are believed to eat plant material in decaying wood, etc. Some are leaf and stem miners. Some are predaceous. Adults visit flowers.”  Based on that, we would say it is beneficial, though benign might be a better term.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this guy called?
Geographic location of the bug:  Driftwood, TX
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 10:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello 🙂 We round this guy in the kitchen on May 10 (and took him outside before snapping a photo). What is he?  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

This is a recently hatched Leaf Footed Bug nymph in the genus Acanthocephala.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty Mystery Beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Unknown
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 12:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend who is a collector was gifted this by a friend, and before I go on, I just want to specify that the friend who collects always makes sure the creatures died naturally, or humanely if not naturally (ie severely deformed & no quality of life, euthanized humanely etc), and is an animal lover, but as this was gifted to him, he is unsure of its origins in this instance, but I hope that does not dissuade you from identifying these fascinatingly beautiful beetles if possible…
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Shield Bugs in decorative Mounting

Dear Pam,
These are not beetles.  They are Shield Bugs in the order Scutellaridae.  Without a country of origin, it will be difficult to determine an exact species, but they do resemble the individual in this FlickR posting that be believe was taken in Portugal.  The decorative presentation is reminiscent of Victorian displays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Warner’s Bay NSW
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 04:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify this caterpillar which was on a dwarf Lime Citrus tree? I tried uploading a video before. Wouldn’t allow it. Couldn’t cancel it. Had to start over
How you want your letter signed:  Brian Holt

Orchard Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Brian,
This is the Caterpillar of an Orchard Swallowtail,
Papilio aegeus, and you can verify our identification on Butterfly House where it states:  “Although this Caterpillar is a pest on suburban Lemon trees, it is one of the most interesting caterpillars in Australia, Both its structure and its behaviour have evolved to an extraordinary degree to give it protective mechanisms against predators. It also grows into one of the largest butterflies to grace suburban gardens.”  Here is an image from FlickR.  Though they feed on the leaves, unless you have a very small tree and a large number of caterpillars, the damage is not lethal to the tree.  We would allow the caterpillar to remain so you can enjoy the adult Orchard Swallowtail.

Thank you for your help. This is exactly the advice I gave my customers on my gardening FB Page. I’d like to publish your response there.
Regards, Brian Holt
HOLTS Prestige Gardens

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterflies or Moths
Geographic location of the bug:  Taiwan
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 03:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I was wondering if you could help me identify this caterpillar.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Libbi

Ichneumon Pupa

Hi again Libby,
We are greatly troubled as we are nearly certain we have identified a very similarly looking suspended pupa in the past, possibly from Australia, but we cannot recall what it is.  We are posting this as unidentified and we hope our readership will assist in the identification.

Update:  Ichneumon Pupa
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, he directed us to this BugGuide posting of an Ichneumon pupa from the genus
Charops.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Iridescent wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Delmont, Pennsylvania
Date: 05/12/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This spectacular wasp was found dead on my car seat.
It is just about a half inch long, living, I estimate.
How you want your letter signed:  Albert in Western PA

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear Albert,
This little beauty is a Cuckoo Wasp in the family Chrysididae.  According to BugGuide:  “Parasitoids feed on the larva of the host and cleptoparasites ‘steal’ the host’s food. The food-stealing behavior of cleptoparasite species resembles that of the cuckoo bird and gave rise to the cuckoo wasp’s name. Hosts of parasitoid species include bees, sphecid wasps, potter wasps, sawflies, silk moths, and the eggs of stick insects. Cleptoparasitic species feed on provisions of sphecid wasp nests, which may include dead spiders, true bugs, aphids, or thrips.”  They are harmless and cannot sting.

Cuckoo Wasp

Thank you very much!
It’s really stunning. It must have overheated inside the car.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination