From the monthly archives: "May 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large bee
Geographic location of the bug:  Berks County Pennsylvania
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 11:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman —
This bee was found in my garage. I’ve never seen one so big. Unfortunately it was killed before I could get to it. The picture doesn’t do it justice. It’s about the thickness of a pinky finger. The giant Asian hornet is the only thing I could find that looked similar. Should I be worried?
How you want your letter signed:  Oswald

European Hornet

Dear Oswald,
This is a European Hornet, a species introduced to North America toward the end of the Nineteenth Century.  It has naturalized.  Though European Hornets are not aggressive, they will sting to defend a nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange segmented fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cincinnati
Date: 05/21/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We’ve had a large number of these critters in the last few weeks. Caught this one sitting on my windshield and was able to get a pretty close image.
How you want your letter signed:  C Hunter

Picture Winged Fly

Dear C Hunter,
This is a Picture Winged Fly,
Delphinia picta,  which is pictured on BugGuide, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in decaying organic matter, such as compost” so we suspect you have a compost pile nearby.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this sunflower loving bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, Arizona. USA
Date: 05/21/2018
Time: 10:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This 6 legged bug likes sunflowers. Never seen this bug in my entire life. Black, red and yellow.  Any idea what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrea ~

Yellow Bellied Bee Assassin

Dear Andrea,
As soon as we read your submission, we suspected you encountered a Yellow Bellied Bee Assassin,
Apiomerus flaviventris, and sure enough, you had.  Bee Assassins are predatory Assassin Bugs and as their name implies, they favor pollinating insects including Bees, and they frequently wait on blooms like your sunflower for a meal to arrive.  According to BugGuide:  “This species exhibits a high level of polychromatism although in the United States the color pattern is fairly uniform.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  this bug  is totally weird and awesome
Geographic location of the bug:  Sonoma county northern California
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 12:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was on a rose in my garden. Seems totally harmless, my son and I held it for a while, very cool little bug. Really want to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Hannah Erickson

Wingless Scorpionfly

Dear Hannah,
We can’t agree with you more.  This insect is “totally weird and awesome” and at first we thought it might be a wingless Crane Fly, but we quickly realized its head looked more like that of a Scorpionfly, and we discovered
Apterobittacus apterus, a Wingless Scorpionfly or Wingless Hanging Fly on BugGuide where the range is listed as “Central California; common in the San Francisco Bay Area” and the season is listed as “late March to early June.”  On the genus page, BugGuide states “The only completely wingless member of the family.”  There are also images posted to iNaturalist and Encyclopedia of Life.  Scorpionflies are not true flies, and they are harmless predators.

Wingless Scorpionfly

Wingless Scorpionfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Creepiest bug ever!
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester County, ny
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 08:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy in our basement playroom.   It is 2-3” in length.  It’s front claws seem to be  clubs with  sharp looking finger like  protrusions.   Then two more sets  of legs.  The rear has 3 spikes. 1 longer than the other 2   Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Lucille

Mole Cricket

Dear Lucille,
We see from a subsequent email that you have already identified your Mole Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Recently emerged mith
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 12:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What moth?
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy

Isabella Tiger Moth

Dear Kathy,
This is a newly emerged Isabella Tiger Moth, which you can verify thanks to this BugGuide image.  The Isabella Tiger Moth is the adult of the Banded Woolly Bear.

Isabella Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination