From the monthly archives: "May 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some type of beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami, Florida
Date: 05/28/2018
Time: 11:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this by the park near my home
It simply stopped walking when I approached it to take a photo it remained motionless until I stepped back a bit
How you want your letter signed:  Alan H.

Longicorn: Zagymnus clerinus

Dear Alan,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we are confident it is
Zagymnus clerinus based on this BugGuide posting.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults of this uncommon sp. are active Apr-Jul in FL. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Beaufort, NC
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 07:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have recently seen these bugs on a crepe murtle tree
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Barklice

Dear Curious,
These are benign Barklice, commonly called Tree Cattle.  They will not harm your tree. 

Thank you so. I hope for the quick reply.  I had previously sent the same photos to our pest control company and they told me the bugs treehopping nymphs that should be eradicated (for a price of course). It would appear that they were wrong.  I did look up about barklice and I know now that I should check the tree to see if it is healthy or not
Thanks again and what a great service this site does
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  ATL, GA
Date: 05/26/2018
Time: 01:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this Caterpillar?
How you want your letter signed:  Shucks98

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Shucks98,
This is the caterpillar of a Lappet Moth in the family Lasiocampidae, possibly an American Lappet Moth Caterpillar which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Harvestmen
Geographic location of the bug:  South Mississippi
Date: 05/25/2018
Time: 02:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman,
I’m an environmental biology student from Mississippi who loves all things nature. As a hobby I collect salvaged insects that die of natural causes, because I hate the thought of killing anything. I was looking around in my garage when I discovered what I believe to be some sort of harvestmen entangled in a cobweb. At first glance I thought it may just be the cephalothorax of a spider, but upon closer inspection there are no broken off attachment points where an additional abdomen would have been located.  It was very decicated when I found it, so several legs fell off upon retrieving it. I’ve done my best to glue them back on in the correct position. It is a rusty orange color with a defined “Y”  behind its eyes in a cream color. It’s hindmost legs are attatched directly to the rear of its abdomen. It’s chelicerae also appear to  have an underdeveloped claw like appearance. It does not possess “fangs” as a spider would though. I’ve never seen anything like this and it would be a huge help if you could help me identify it!
How you want your letter signed:  Jaden Hendrix

Harvestman

Hi Jaden,
We believe we have identified this Harvestman as a member of the genus
Vonones thanks to these BugGuide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Orange County, NY
Date: 05/26/2018
Time: 08:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Woke up to find this giant bee IN MY BEDROOM this morning. It wanted out (and I wanted it out) and somehow everyone left the room alive. It was a significantly large bee — unquestionably the biggest I’ve ever seen, and solidly in the inch-long realm.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

European Hornet

This is not a bee.  It is a European Hornet, a species introduced to North America at the end of the nineteenth century.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Silk moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica, Montezuma
Date: 05/25/2018
Time: 10:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! I would like to know the species of this Huge moth i saw in a Hotel in Costa Rica. It was as big as mt Hand.
How you want your letter signed:  Mathilde

Giant Silkmoth: Arsenura archianassa

Dear Mathilde,
We are quite certain your Giant Silkmoth is in the genus
Arsenura, and we believe it is Arsenura archianassa based on images we located on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, though it might be a different species.  There is a mounted specimen pictured on Bold Systems.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can confirm the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination