What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cecropia Moths A-mating?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fayetteville, Georgia
Date: 05/05/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! My mom and I spotted this fuzzy lady hanging out on our front doorway around noon on May 5, 2018. She stayed there all day long, and when I checked again a little after seven, I discovered she had company.
Thanks to your website, I think they’re Cecropia Moths? I’m just a little unsure because the male is so much smaller and darker than the female.
How you want your letter signed:  Lauren C.

Female Promethea Moth

Dear Lauren,
Though they resemble Cecropia Moths, your mating pair are actually Promethea Moths,
Callosamia promethea, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females come to lights but males do not” though we suspect an exception is that a male will be attracted to a female who was attracted to a light.  BugGuide also indicates an alternate name is Spicebush Silkmoth and states:  “larvae feed on leaves of apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush [sic], sweetgum, tulip-tree; also recorded on buttonbush, magnolia, and other trees adults do not feed.”

Mating Promethea Moths

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Fayetteville, Georgia

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