From the monthly archives: "May 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mosquito / may fly / dragon fly with tail
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Island, NY
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 01:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These long tailed flies are swarming our house.  They don’t move much. They just sit on the screens and doors -Many until they die. We’re presuming they hatched from dirty rain gutters from a house we just bought. Some seem to be coming from vents outside that lead to the attic.  Please don’t let them be in the attic… They have long curved bodies and long tails.  We have a newborn and are nervous about them getting in because there are thousands of them. It’s like a scary movie bug swarm. Hoping they hate human blood.  Are they a beneficial fly that will prey on a nuisance species or are they out to get us? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned new parents.

Mayfly

Dear Concerned new parents,
Other than being a nuisance when they are numerous, Mayflies like the one in the image you submitted are perfectly harmless and they will not harm you or your home.  The larvae of Mayflies are aquatic, so we suspect you are near some body of water.

I’m about half a mile from a river. But there was a lot of standing water all over this property before we took ownership of it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Garden bug
Geographic location of the bug:  United Kingdom (burton on trent)
Date: 05/30/2018
Time: 04:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this bug as it is troubling my children
How you want your letter signed:  Joe smith

Cockchafer

Dear Joe,
This Cockchafer is a relatively common Scarab Beetle found in the UK and other parts of Europe. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looks like a rare moth almost 1″ wingspan and length
Geographic location of the bug:  NW Montana
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this in our lawn a few days ago. Thought it was a bee, but could actually be a moth.
How you want your letter signed:  Rich Kurth

Bee Hawkmoth

Dear Rich,
This Bee Hawk Moth is called solely by its scientific name 
Hemaris thetis on BugGuide. but on Sphingidae of the Americas, it is given a physiologically descriptive common name.

Thank you Daniel. You nailed it. An absolutely beautiful moth.
Rich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some type of fly
Geographic location of the bug:  SW Pennsylvania
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 11:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve recentky been bitten to hell and back by these things. There is a development starting behind my house and all these new bugs have started to come out of the woods since they are clearing the area. The itch
How you want your letter signed:  Doesn’t matter

Female Horse Fly

This is a female Horse Fly and it is possible that habitat destruction has affected its food source.  Female Horse Flies are blood suckers and they might have been feeding on livestock or deer, but they are opportunistic and they will bite humans if no other prey is available.  The two species your individual closely resembles are Tabanus limbatinevris pictured on BugGuide and Tabanus sulcifrons also pictured on BugGuide.

Female Horse Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantis?
Geographic location of the bug:  Corpus Christi, Texas
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 11:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! Can you help me identify this flying bug? I THINK it only has 4 legs, so it’s not REALLY an insect, is it? It was on a friend’s porch last week.
How you want your letter signed:  B. McCray

Mantispid

Dear B. McCray,
Though it resembles a Mantis, this Mantispid is a member of an unrelated insect order, the Neuropterans that includes Lacewings and Antlions.  Both Mantids and Mantispids are predators that have adapted to using raptorial front legs for capturing prey.  We believe your individual is 
Dicromantispa interrupta based on this BugGuide image.

One quick question, tho – I know this isn’t a “praying” mantis – but I see “mantis” in the title “Mantispid” – so, are they related?
Thank you!!!
B. McCray
We repeat:  “Though it resembles a Mantis, this Mantispid is a member of an unrelated insect order, the Neuropterans that includes Lacewings and Antlions.”
Isn’t it odd, then for the word “mantis” to be part of the official word of what it is? It just seems confusing. 
But thanks!
Common names are often descriptive, and the resemblance between true Mantids and this Mantispid is being acknowledged in the name.  P.S.  Your submission is Bug of the Month for June 2018.
Oooo, that’s cool!! I just moved out into the Tecas Hill Country, wo we have a LOT of odd looking bugs I may ask you about.
Is that okay?

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rare Type of Ladybug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA
Date: 05/28/2018
Time: 09:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this spectacular beetle on Stoney Man Mountain (~3800 ft elevation) in Shenandoah National Park. We thought it might be a rare type of ladybug/ladybird; but we have been unable to find this pattern (with black, red, and shiny gold outlining) in any guide. Can you help us ID this gorgeous beetle?
How you want your letter signed:  Adam & Caleb

Leaf Beetle

Dear Adam & Caleb,
This is not a Lady Beetle.  It is a Leaf Beetle in the genus
Calligrapha, possibly Calligrapha spiraea based on this BugGuide image. 

Thank you!  That looks like the perfect identification!
Best,
Adam

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination