From the monthly archives: "April 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What ciacada species is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Borneo, Sabah
Date: 04/24/2018
Time: 03:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, please help me identify the cicada species.
How you want your letter signed:  gurveena

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear gurveena,
Your images illustrate the metamorphosis of two Cicadas, and we cannot even state for certain they are the same species as they are in different stages of the process.  Furthermore, they have not yet hardened after transformation and they have not yet assumed their final coloration.  Perhaps one of our readers more versed in the Cicadas of Borneo will be able to provide more conclusive identifications.  Your images are awesome.

Cicada Metamorphosis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Ottawa ontario canada
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 07:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this bug casually crossing a busy street on April 24 2018. The crab like front legs and bulging eyes kind of creeped us out. We put something in the frame to measure by.
How you want your letter signed:  Gabrielle

Toe-Biter

Dear Gabrielle,
This is not a Beetle.  It is an aquatic True Bug commonly called a Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar on Virginia creeper
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgetown County, SC
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 07:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I observed this caterpillar on my Virginia creeper  October 26-November 2, 2017.  I’m wondering if it could be a hydrangea Sphinx.
How you want your letter signed:  Sybil Collins

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Sybil,
This is the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and it is feeding on a Virginia Creeper.  We quickly identified it as a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx, Darapsa myron, thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “freshly-emerged larvae have a slender yellowish body, relatively large brown head, and disproportionately long black anal horn; mature larvae have a green or brown body with a white stripe along the side smudging downwards into diagonal stripes. Head and anterior thoracic segments slender in mature larvae (body swells greatly at third throacic segment, as in Azalea Sphinx). Spiracular spots small and orange, edged top and bottom with white dots. Horn granular.” 

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  unidentified flying pollinator
Geographic location of the bug:  Hillsborough, NJ, USA
Date: 04/23/2018
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Greetings:
I saw something pollinating some Spring Beauties on April 21. I assumed at the time that I was getting photos of some sort of bee, but when I got a closer look at the pictures when I got home I got more of a fly (or mosquito?) vibe from it. Can you give me an idea of what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  John

Greater Bee Fly

Dear John,
You are correct that this is not a Bee.  It is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major.  According to BugGuide:  “A common and widespread bee fly, often seen taking nectar on early spring wildflowers or seen hovering in sunny patches in woodlands” and “adults fly from March to May (most common in April).”

Greater Bee Fly

Greetings:
Thanks – that sure looks like the little fella I saw last weekend. We’ve had a colder-than-average spring so flowers are just kicking into gear and I’m not seeing many pollinators yet. This guy turned out to be a little more interesting than I expected.

John

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Satellite Sphinx of Mexico?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tamaulipas, Mexico
Date: 04/22/2018
Time: 05:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
My parents just sent me this photo of what I think is a Satellite Sphinx, taken outside their residence in Tamaulipas, Mexico. It’s markings are gorgeous and resemble some of the photos I’ve seen you post of Eumorpha Satellita, but I also spot some differences, like the dark brown, triangular patches behind its head. Am I on the right track with identifying it as the Satellite Sphinx?
How you want your letter signed:  H. Oakes

Satellite Sphinx

Dear H. Oakes,
We agree with you that this looks like a Satellite Sphinx, and its markings look almost exactly those of the individual in this BugGuide posting.  There are also images on Sphingidae of the Americas.  There are 11
Eumorpha species reported as ranging in Mexico on Sphingidae of the Americas, and some look similar, but in our opinion, the Satellite Sphinx is the closest visual match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fun red bug of Togo
Geographic location of the bug:  Sokodé, Togo
Date: 04/22/2018
Time: 10:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this red bug in Togo which fascinates me.  Can you identify it, please?
How you want your letter signed:  Jerry Day

Immature Red Bug

Dear Jerry,
Your image is really great, but we are not going to be able to provide you more than a very general identification.  This is an immature Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and we suspect it is probably a Cotton Stainer in the genus
Dysdercus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination