From the monthly archives: "April 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Foothills of Western Cascades in Washington
Date: 04/26/2018
Time: 09:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this on our deck… Can’t recall seeing a red beetle in our area before. What’s that bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Anonymous

Red Flat Bark Beetle

Dear Anonymous,
This is a Red Flat Bark Beetle,
Cucujus clavipes, and according to the Pennsylvania State University site:  “The flat bark beetle is found in forested habitats of northern North America (Alaska, Canada, and many northern and central U.S. states). … Adults are typically found under the bark in living or freshly cut trees although they might also be present in old logs and even in the leaf litter around fallen or cut trees. Tree species that seem to be preferred by the flat bark beetle include poplars, ashes, and oaks, but they are also found in a wide range of other species of trees. The adult flat bark beetles are active predators within their constricted, sub-bark micro-habitat.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Guérande butterfly
Location:  Guérande, France
Date:  April 27, 2018

Swallowtail

Yesterday Monique and her sister Michele from France visited for coffee and Michele asked about this lovely butterfly, which we identified as an Old World Swallowtail, Papilio machaon, though the common name is just Swallowtail according to the Butterflies of Britain & Europe where it states:  “Papilio machaon is widespread and common throughout much of the northern hemisphere. It occurs over the whole of continental Europe, eastward across temperate Asia to Japan; in Africa north of the Sahara; and throughout much of North America. In Britain it is locally common on the Norfolk Broads, an area of fenland and lakes in eastern England.
Individuals originating from France occasionally migrate across the English Channel and have been periodically recorded in Hampshire, Dorset, Sussex and the Isle of Wight, but such sightings are very rare – perhaps one or two sightings per year. Genuine migrants can usually be recognised by their faded and worn appearance.  Fresh looking insects seen anywhere apart from Norfolk can be attributed to escaped or deliberately released livestock – both the British subspecies brittanicus and the continental gorganus are commonly reared by hobbyists. ( it is illegal to capture or breed stock of British origin, but nevertheless a widespread practice ).
There are no similar species occurring in Britain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black Bristly Caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego, California
Date: 04/24/2018
Time: 03:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, I have been finding these black bristly caterpillars every spring for 3 years in my backyard. They don’t have red or Orange bands so they aren’t Leopard Moth Caterpillars (Which is what ice been calling them). They have pale red/Orange bumps under they’re bristles. I have lots if questions so please write back asap!
How you want your letter signed:  Savannah D.

Probably Painted Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Savannah,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, the group that contains the Leopard Moth, though that is an eastern species.  Considering your location, we suspect this is the caterpillar of a Painted Tiger Moth,
Arachnis picta, a species that is quite numerous at our Mount Washington, Los Angeles office.  Alas, our go-to site for identifications, BugGuide, has no images of Painted Tiger Moth caterpillars except newly hatched individuals, however, BugGuide does provide this description:  “Larva – covered in dense black and cinnamon-colored bristles.”  The adult Painted Tiger Moth is a lovely insect that is frequently attracted to porch lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug seen on my orchid  leaf
Geographic location of the bug:  inside my house in virginia beach
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I saw this  bug on my orchid. I think he is pretty.
How you want your letter signed:  VA bug lover

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear VA bug lover,
In this case, you chose wisely.  This is an immature Assassin Bug, probably in the genus
Zelus, and it is a predator that will help keep injurious insects from your orchid.  We would urge you to exercise caution.  Though not considered dangerous, we have received several reports of people being bitten by Assassin Bugs in the genus Zelus.

Assassin Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orb Weaver
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 06:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I found this beautiful spider in the center of its round web. It was in a bog in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, in stand of Cedar Trees. Also growing in the area were Pitch Pine, blueberry, lichen, and a variety of wetland plants.
The spider was small, maybe about a 1/4 inch long.  I found it today, April 25th.
These are my own photos.
Thanks very much!
How you want your letter signed:  Shawn McClure

Possibly Giant Lichen Orbweaver

Dear Shawn,
Our best guess is that this is a Giant Lichen Orbweaver, Araneus bicentenarius, which is pictured here on BugGuide and here on BugGuide.  Exact identification might prove difficult because based on the time of year, your location and the size you indicate, this is probably an immature individual that will mature in the fall.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Woodlands, on trees, among lichens.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help!!! What is this bug???
Geographic location of the bug:  Johnson city, tn
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 05:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Help!!!!   My daughter was infested with lice about a month ago.  She is clear.  In the meantime I’ve treated my head 2 times because I’ve pulled these bugs out of my hair and to be cautious.  This makes it the 3rd one I’ve seen.  Head is itchy in the back and sides.
How you want your letter signed:  Really desperate

Louse

Dear Really desperate,
Either your treatment was not effective or you have been reinfested.  This is a Louse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination