From the monthly archives: "February 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID help please!
Geographic location of the bug:  North Eastern CT, USA
Date: 02/21/2018
Time: 08:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
Sorry that they are dead, I just found these guys in a cup of water in my backyard. Can you help me figure out what they are?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in CT

Globular Springtails

Dear Curious in CT,
When we were renaming the digital image you sent, we realized that several years ago we posted another identification for Globular Springtails from Connecticut.  Though they can become very numerous when conditions are favorable, Globular Springtails are benign creatures and they are no cause for concern.

Thank you SO much for your response (and all the great work you do!).
I am so happy to hear they are harmless. I found more in my bird bath and near my chicken coop so that’s a big relief.
Thanks again, have a great weekend!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of bee? is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  North America, California, Northern California
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 08:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me identify this little nugget! I’m so curious, especially as I have exhausted my own resources for identifying it. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Kayt

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Kayt,
This is a male Valley Carpenter BeeFemales of the species are black and they are more commonly sighted as they have a longer life span.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug or fossil?
Geographic location of the bug:  Saw Washington state
Date: 02/19/2018
Time: 02:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have no idea what this is. It was found in Southwest Washington state and is the second one we found. The first one was a couple months ago this one was just found a couple days ago (that would be early February). At first I thought it was a fossil but now I’m not so sure. If you can’t tell me what it is do you know who I might ask that’s local to Southwest Washington?
How you want your letter signed:  M.c.hlousek

Mantis Ootheca

Dear M.c.hlousek,
This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis, but we cannot say for certain if it is a native species or a species introduced for agricultural purposes.  When conditions are correct, you should expect young mantids to hatch and begin hunting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  March fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tampa bay fl
Date: 02/19/2018
Time: 04:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We were on the beach and everyone assumed it was a love bug but it was solid black the size of  my Fingernail.   They were in a swarm landing on people some people were covered in about 20 of them .
How you want your letter signed:  Nicole

March Fly

Dear Nicole,
This is indeed a female March Fly.  The Love Bugs that are well known in parts of Florida and the South are also March Flies, but Love Bugs,
Plecia nearctica, which are pictured on BugGuide, are red and black.  So, all Love Bugs are March Flies, but there are many species of March Flies that are not Love Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp from Costa Rica
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Viejo de Talamanca, Limon
Date: 02/17/2018
Time: 01:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found this wasp in the beach. I think is a kind of digger wasp or mud dauber but I would like to know exactly name.
How you want your letter signed:  Bichos

Sand Wasp

Dear Bichos,
Based on images posted to BugGuide, we feel pretty confident that this is a Sand Wasp in the tribe Bembicini, but we are not able to provide you with an exact species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found this in my yard last summer
Geographic location of the bug:  Sherwood Park, Alberta
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 11:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was really big. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Hi

Poplar Borer

Based on this BugGuide image, we are pretty confident that your Longicorn is a Poplar Borer, Saperda calcarata, and it is described on BugGuide as being:  “Largest of its genus. Prominent spines at tips of elytra. Coloration variable, pastel hues.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination