From the monthly archives: "February 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Central West western australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 06:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these many times over my lifetime but never known what they are. I have tried to find info via Google and the closest thing I’ve found is cicada.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Helen

Antlion

Dear Helen,
This is an Antlion, not a Cicada.  The larvae of Antlions are frequently called Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 01:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering what bug this is
How you want your letter signed:  Diana

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Diana,
This is a False Bombardier Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars” and “Caution: These beetles have chemical defenses.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug found by swimming pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Brisbane Australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 09:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi  we came across this guy the other day. Found by my grand daughter. Just wondered if you have seen anything like it before. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Gary Buckle

Mealybug Destroyer Larva

Dear Gary,
This looks to us like the larva of a Lady Beetle known as a Mealybug Destroyer, a species native to Australia that has been exported for agricultural purposes to help control populations of Mealybugs in agricultural areas.  The larva is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rust to reddish beetle type bug with black head and antenna.
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach, VA
Your letter to the bugman:  Today,  February 25, 2018, this small bug was on my husband’s arm in the car.  We pulled over and put him out by our house along the woods.  I took a few pictures first.  Thanks so much.
How you want your letter signed:  PamS

Red Net-Winged Beetle

Dear PamS,
This is a Red Net-Winged Beetle or Golden Net-Winged Beetle,
Dictyoptera aurora, and according to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “coniferous/mixed forests, in decaying logs; adults on and under bark of decaying stumps and on tree trunks; also on flowers.”

Red Net-Winged Beetle

You totally rock!  Thanks so much!  I use your on-line resource so often and really appreciate all you do!!! This one really had me stumped, lol.  I save every bug and feed ALL animals, lol.  I always take a picture before I rescue these small and sometimes larger miracles!  Sometime you should write a book and I would buy it in a second!!!  I still love having a hard copy….  You truly are experts!!! Sincerely, PamS

Thank you PamS.  Daniel did write The Curious World of Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Louisiana
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been trying to figure out what kind of moth this is and it’s driving me crazy
How you want your letter signed:  Don’t know what this means

Wood Nymph Moth

This is one of the Wood Nymph moths in the genus Eudryas, and it is believed they mimic bird droppings as a means of camouflage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating bugs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Goromondzi, nr Harare, Zimbabwe
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 08:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Are these two bugs a male and female mating? The smaller one on the back looked similar to a grasshopper.  Found out in the bush. The larger one appeared to struggle to move with the other on its back.
How you want your letter signed:  P Mcleod

Mating Grasshoppers

Dear P Mcleod,
These are indeed Grasshoppers, and it is not unusual for the female to be significantly larger than the male in many species of Grasshoppers which is obvious during mating.  We believe your individuals are in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.

Wow. Thank you for such a quick response. I should have realised the larger one was a grasshopper but I have never seen one like it before.
Thank you again
Phyllida
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination