From the monthly archives: "January 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Jupiter Florida
Date: 01/25/2018
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this in my walk today.
I was told it was a pregnant moth. What kind is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Judy from Jupiter

Female Polyphemus Moth

Dear Judy,
You were told correct information.  This is a female Polyphemus Moth and she is indeed filled with eggs.  Like other members of her Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae, the female emerges from the pupal state filled with eggs and ready to mate.  Moths in this family do not eat as adults.  They live for a few days, long enough to mate and reproduce.  We hope you had the opportunity to observe the dorsal surface of her wings, as there are large eyespots on the underwings that are used to startle birds or other predators into perceiving that they are about to be eaten by a much larger creature when they try to eat this tasty morsel.

Thank you so much for the information.
It is always a good day when you learn something new.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wierd cocoon thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  Broulee NSW Australia
Date: 01/24/2018
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in a pile of raked up leaves in the middle of summer. The top part that seems to be segments was twitching back and forth when disturbed.
How you want your letter signed:  Kell

Probably Hawk Moth Pupa

Dear Kell,
This pupa will eventually become a very large moth.  We do not believe it is in the family Saturniidae.  We suspect it is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Moths in this family do not spin cocoons.  They produce a naked pupa like the one you found, and it is generally underground or among leaf litter.  Many Sphingidae pupae are pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hatchling California Mantis
Geographic Location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date:  Monday, January 22, 2018
Time:  4:30 PM PST
This past Monday, while taking an unrelated photo of a model using a 4×5 camera and film, Daniel spotted a hatchling California Mantis on the patio roof.  It was scuttling along quite quickly and without a digital camera handy, the sighting went unrecorded.  The proximity of this sighting to the body of the female California Mantis that died without laying eggs has only fueled Daniel’s unrealistic hope that some eggs might hatch, protected by the body of their dead mother.  Though that is a remote fantasy, this is nonetheless an extremely early sighting for a Mantis hatchling in Southern California as we don’t normally see hatchlings until April, but this has been a warm and dry Southern California winter thusfar.  Lacking an image of the hatchling, we are posting a scanned photo from a 4×5 negative of the final resting place (an empty aquarium) of our female California Mantis that died after an unknown trauma caused her egg-filled abdomen to burst.  Meanwhile we will search for more hatchlings in the coming weeks.

Dead female California Mantis (filled with eggs)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar/grub id
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Panhadle WV
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 09:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this little guy/gal outside today I think it may be confused due to warm weather we have been having
How you want your letter signed:  Catherine Hubbard

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Catherine,
Our initial impression was that this might be the larva of an Elm Sawfly, but then we saw then large head, which leads us to believe this is a Skipper Caterpillar similar to this image posted to BugGuide.  Skippers are classified as butterflies, but they share many of the characteristics of moths.

Skipper Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mid Atlantic. Southern Delaware by the ocean
Date: 01/23/2018
Time: 11:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I brought my red worm composting operation in doors because of the super cold temperatures.  I am sure these bugs hatched in the worm bin.  I have seen at least a dozen of them in the house.  I looked in the worm bin and there were several in the bin. If the picture is not adequate I probably can get a better one.
Thanks for all your efforts!
How you want your letter signed:  David Elder

Black Soldier Fly

Dear David,
This Black Soldier Fly,
Hermettia illucens, also called a Window Fly because of the transparent areas on the abdomen, is perfectly harmless.  Its larvae have no doubt been living in your compost pile and the warm conditions indoors probably hastened the maturing process.

Thanks so much DAN da Man!
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tampa, Florida
Date: 01/23/2018
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on the outside wall of my garage. Snapped this photo with my phone.  Very interested in finding out what it is!  Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Selcuk Mumcu

Hey – we found it.  It was a FISHFLY….

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Selcuk,
You are correct.  We believe this is a male Spring Fishfly, which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination