From the monthly archives: "January 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  is this a type of darkling beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Buffalo New York
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I have been trying to identify this Beetle on your site and the closest I can come is that it is a darkling beetle. This one was alive, two others that I found in my apartment this week were already dead. Beatles are not poisonous are they? Thanks for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  V

Weevil

Dear V,
We believe this is a Weevil, and based on the image posted to the Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Program site, it resembles the Annual Bluegrass Weevil,
Listronotus maculicollis, and when we researched the species on BugGuide, we found that it is a relatively large genus represented on BugGuide and the tribe to which it belongs has two genera, and many members look similar, so we feel confident this is a Weevil, and it might be a member of the tribe Listroderini, but we are uncertain of the species.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for your quick identification! I now know how to research what to do about them. Have a great night.
Best,
Venessa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rhysida longipes
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami, Florida
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 01:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  When visiting relatives in Florida last year, I helped my uncle move old boards out of an unused sandbox. Underneath one board there was a pile of large, greenish centipedes that scattered as they were uncovered. As an invertebrate enthusiast, I am always on the lookout for new species of arthropod to observe, capture,  and/or breed, so I had a container handy and was able to capture a 3-4″ specimen that was slower than the rest. There weren’t any containers large enough to house it in safely so I had to use this yellow bucket until I found an appropriate one.
I had hoped to find other centipede species in Florida such as S. viridis or S. longipes, but this one was clearly neither of those. After a bit of research I learned that R. longipes is an adventive species originally native to Africa and Asia that has now colonized Florida and Mexico as well.  I thought I’d send this in so people could properly identify common giant centipedes, as many pictures of R. longipes from Florida are mistakenly identified as Scolopendra and Hemiscolopendra on other sites.
As for the specimen I caught, she is now comfortably living in captivity and has regrown some of the lost antennomeres since these photos were taken.
How you want your letter signed:  lawnshrimp

African Longtail Centipede with Cockroach prey

Dear lawnshrimp,
Thanks for sending your images of the introduced African Longtail Centipede, a name we located on FlickR where it states:  “Though this exotic species has been found on occasion in Florida, all but one incidence was of solitary animals and it has never been considered an established part of the Florida fauna. Late in 2014, while on a scientific collecting trip to south Florida, we came across a large population of this species, which included juveniles through adults, on one of the main Keys. The animals had never been recorded from this area. Later that same evening, we located a large adult just outside of the Everglades National Park, representing an additional locality for this taxon. We wrote up a brief communication for this new, established member of the south Florida ecosystem for the Florida Entomologist which is currently in review.”  We also found your images posted to Arachnoboards.  Whenever we learn of an introduced species into an ecosystem, we are concerned that native species might be displaced due to larger or more aggresive introductions.

African Longtail Centipede with Cockroach prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  whats that bug
Geographic location of the bug:  greece athens area
Date: 01/28/2018
Time: 03:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi we found some of these bugs in our bathroom
Do you know what is it and if it is dangerous or needs treatment
Regards
How you want your letter signed:  VP

Barklouse

Dear VP,
This looks to us like a benign Barklouse in the order Psocodea.  In our opinion, treatment is not necessary, though when plentiful, Barklouse might be a nuisance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What Bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester, New York,  USA
Date: 01/28/2018
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi There,
I was hoping you could help identify this. My sister works in a historic house. These bugs were found living in the rolled up carpets in the house.  They did not seem to be eating the carpet. They were found last week and they are a little bigger than a deer tick.
How you want your letter signed:  AL

Shiny Spider Beetle

Dear Al,
This is a Spider Beetle in the genus
Mezium, probably the Shiny Spider Beetle which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Spider Beetles feed on “dry stored products.”  Though they generally infest stored foods, they might also feed on organic fibers in carpets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified tiny bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Clearwater, Florida
Date: 01/28/2018
Time: 07:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman.
I’m sincerely hoping you can identify this tiny bug that I keep finding crawling on me when I am in my living room at home. This only started a couple of weeks ago.
Fortunately, I’ve ruled out bed bugs. I tried to take useful photos, but I apologize for the poor quality.
I have a cat, but she has never been outside, and I’ve checked her over and found no sign of fleas. I’m almost certain this bug doesn’t fly, but it moves quickly.
I know you’re busy, but I’m grasping at straws.
Thank you for taking the time to read this.
How you want your letter signed:  Jackie Burger

Flea

Dear Jackie,
This looks like a Flea to us.  Even indoor cats can get Fleas, and households with no pets can also get Fleas.  Once when our editorial staff had no pets, a family of feral cats living under the house cause a major Flea infestation.  Squirrels and other rodents living in close proximity to a home might introduce Fleas to the household.

Flea

Hello, Daniel.
Thank you! I really appreciate you taking the time to identify this bug. I was able to get rid of them and my cat couldn’t be happier.
Thanks again!
Jackie Burger
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of caterpillar is it
Geographic location of the bug:  Ballito south Africa
Date: 01/04/2018
Time: 01:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please could you let me know what type of caterpillar it is and are they poisonous it is about 10 cm long and as thick as a pork sausage
How you want your letter signed:  Very interested

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

Dear Very Interested,
When we first posted images of this Spiny Hornworm Caterpillar,
Lophostethus dumolinii, back in 2011, it proved quite the challenge to identify.  We sought the assistance of Bill Oehlke with the identification.  At that time, we couldn’t locate any matching images online. We now found a matching image on Aylestone 8:  Biodiversity on my Farm and there is also an image on African Moths.  Hornworms, the caterpillars of Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, are not poisonous or venomous, and despite a sometimes fierce appearance, they are harmless to humans.

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination