From the monthly archives: "January 2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  winnipeg Manitoba Canada
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 04:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  please identify this bug I found crawling across a cement floor at work
How you want your letter signed:  bob

Masked Hunter

Hi Bob,
This is an immature Masked Hunter, a species of predatory Assassin Bug.  The exoskeleton of a newly molted immature Masked Hunter is sticky, and it attracts debris that helps to camouflage the insect, and helps explain the common name.  Masked Hunters might bite if carelessly handled, but they will also help to keep unwanted creatures from proliferating.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this please?
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth Western Australia
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 02:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found in my carport.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you in advance

Katydid

The closest visual match we could locate online of your female Katydid are the postings of the genus Pachysaga on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What am I and can i kill trees?
Geographic location of the bug:  Millican Tx
Date: 01/30/2018
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, recently i hauled off a dead tree from my mothers house and while cutting it up for firewood, found this Larva stage looking fellow.. id like to know what kind of insect this is and is it capable of killing trees once it burrowed in or was it just looking for a spot to metamorphosis?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Vivian Stanley

Beetle Grub: Cerambycidae or Buprestidae???

Dear Vivian,
This is a Beetle Grub, most likely from either the Longhorned Borer family Cerambycidae, or the Metallic Borer family Buprestidae.  A single grub will not kill a tree, but a serious infestation might compromise the health of a tree.  You did not indicate what type of tree it was since many Borer Beetles are very host specific.  Additionally, you did not indicate the size.  Immature Grubs can be difficult to identify with certainty, and we cannot see enough features, including the head, to help narrow down the possibilities.

Thanks so much for your speedy response, i truly appreciate it. The information you’ve provided will be most helpful indeed!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange big spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Bonito, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Date: 01/06/2018
Time: 06:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear WTB,
I found the attached orange spider in the rainforests of Rio Bonito, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More precisely, in (-22.660427,-42.592756):
https://www.google.com/maps/place/2239’36.5S+4235’33.7W/@-22.660427,-42.592756,18z/data=!3m1!1e3
It was big, with the body length of about 4cm. I’m attaching 3 pictures.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Luis A. Florit

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

Dear Luis,
This is one beautiful Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, a group of harmless Spiders that build orb webs in which to snare prey. Interestingly, we were able to identify your individual as
Eriophora fuliginea thanks to the ventral view of this image on FlickR.  There is a matching dorsal view on Gallery Kunzweb and another ventral view on The Natural World.  This really is quite a beautiful spider.

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

Dear Daniel,
Indeed, it was quite beautiful, I spent a long time shooting it because the light was bad. By the orange color I thought it wasn’t harmless, so I didn’t approach.
Thanks a lot for the identification! Your site and the whole idea is amazing.
Cheers!
L.

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Horsefly or Drone?
Geographic location of the bug:  Chile central
Date: 01/06/2018
Time: 06:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This little fellow was spotted on a tree. Ive never seen this kind before in this region, we have gray horse flies and Scapia Lata in the south.  Seeing it from distance it looked like a queen bee or drone (because of the size), a “bumblebee male” someone suggested, but I believe is a smartly bee-colored horsefly. Can you identify the bug ?
How you want your letter signed:  Mr.

Robber Fly

Dear Mr.,
This is one impressive looking female, predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We were unable to locate any Chilean individuals that resemble your submission, but it does remind us of the North American Bee Killers.  Large Robber Flies like this one often take large winged prey, including wasps and bees, on the wing.

Thank you very much!!! Your identification has been confirmed by a local entomologist, this specimen corresponds to Obelophorus landbecki species, apparently a stealthy hunter from the arid Chilean central zone.

Thanks so much for writing back with a species identification.  We did locate an image on the Pierre.Comte.Over blog as well as an image on Insectos de Chile, and in both instances they are images of mounted specimens.  We could not find any images online of living specimens, which makes the posting of your contribution to our site unique.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  The Gambia
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 08:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
I have long wondered what this is, taken in the Gambia in 2008. Not sure if its a bug or a strange moth. I would be grateful if you could help ID it
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Richard Heath

Lanternfly

Dear Richard,
This free-living Hemipteran in the family Fulgoridae is commonly called a Lanternfly.  There is a similar looking Lanternfly from Gambia posted to FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination