From the yearly archives: "2018"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Friend or Foe?
Geographic location of the bug:  Pateros , WA
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 06:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was moving among the flowering herbs at edge of garden this weekend.  He looks formidable with extremely long back legs.   What is he?
How you want your letter signed:  Charlene

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Charlene,
This large, impressive wasp is a Great Golden Digger Wasp, a solitary species that is not aggressive toward humans.  Was it moving among the flowering herbs like it was more interested in the flowers or like it was searching for something?  This is a pollinating species that feed on nectar as an adult, but it is carnivorous, but helpless, as a larva.  The female Great Golden Digger Wasp hunts for Katydids among the foliage and when she locates one, she stings it to paralyze it and then drags it back to her subterranean nest as food for her brood.  We vote “friend.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Well-camouflaged beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Burns, TN 37029 (Montgomery Bell State Park)
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi–
I saw this bug on July 23rd of this year and was impressed by its effective camouflage on the decaying bridge rail. It looks somewhat like a Southwestern Ironclad Beetle, but Tennessee is well out of that beetle’s range. Any idea what else it could be?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Tennessee

Avocado Weevil

Dear Curious in Tennessee,
We agree that your beetle resembles the Ironclad Beetle found from Texas westward, and we thought it resembled a Weevil, so we searched through Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans and we quickly located the Avocado Weevil,
Heilipus apiatus.  The book states:  “Adults are found year-round, but reach peak activity in summer, found on sassafras (Sassafras) and under pine (Pinus) bark.  Adults and larvae are serious pests of avocados (Persea); adults eat young fruits, while larvae bore and develop in base of trunk.  Virginia to Florida west to Tennessee.”  There are images on Forestry Images and on BugGuide.

Perfect! Many thanks for your quick reply. I’m going share your reply with my curious Facebook friends and encourage donations to WTB.
Best,
Maria
(aka Curious in Tennessee)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What spider is this carrying it’s egg sac?
Geographic location of the bug:  Robertson, Western Cape, South Africa
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
We were wondering if you could tell us what kind of spider this is carrying it’s egg sac?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Pearce

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Pearce,
We can narrow this identification down to the family, but we cannot say for certain that we know the genus or species.  There are two families of Spiders where the female carries about the egg sac.  Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae drag the egg sac from the spinnerets while Nursery Web Spiders, including Fishing Spiders, in the family Pisauridae carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs.  Your individual is a Nursery Web Spider.  According to BioDiversity Explorer:  “All pisaurids construct a round white egg case that is carried under the sternum held in the chelicerae (jaws). This causes them to assume a tiptoe stance. Just before the eggs are due to hatch, the female constructs a nursery web around the egg case. This is attached to the vegetation with a supporting web around it. The spiderlings leave the nursery after one or two moults.”  Wikimedia Commons has an image that looks very much like your individual, and it is identified as
Chiasmopes lineatus, but there are no images of that genus on BioDiversity Explorer.  The only other representative of the genus we could find is on Project Noah, but it is a much thinner and smaller male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s Hatching on my Super Lemon Haze?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 09:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I’m sorry to trouble you again so soon, but because I am very nervous regarding Budworms, I am trying to inspect my plants carefully every day.  Today I noticed these creatures hatching from eggs laid on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid.  They were moving around the eggs quickly and appeared to be crawling on top of one another.  What’s going on here?  Do I have a need to worry?
The first photo was shot without a flash and the other two were shot with a flash.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Constant Gardener,
These appear to be Stink Bug Eggs, possibly from the Red Shouldered Stink Bug you submitted yesterday, but those are not Stink Bugs that are hatching.  We immediately suspected some Parasitoid Wasp, so we researched Parasitoids that attack Stink Bug eggs, and we found this image on BugGuide of a parasitoid in the genus
Telenomus that looks similar to your individuals and this image on BugGuide of another member of the genus.  We also located this image on BugGuide of a different parasitoid in the genus Trissolcus and this image on BugGuide of a member in that same genus, both of which have also parasitized Stink Bug eggs.  Of the latter genus, BugGuide indicates:  “parasitize eggs of Pentatomorpha.”  Your images lack critical sharpness due to soft focus, and the images taken with flash also have some “ghosting” from a slow shutter speed.  Additionally, we lack the necessary expertise to provide an accurate species or genus identification, but both genera are in the subfamily Telenominae in the family Platygastridae, and this represents a new subcategory for our site.  Furthermore, your images are excellent examples of how pests can be controlled with organic methods.

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stickbug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silver Spring, MD
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in the back yard.  Looks like there maybe eggs on its back.  Is it going to mess up my garden?
How you want your letter signed:  Gene

Parasitized Inchworm with Chalcid Pupae

Dear Gene,
Your “stickbug” is an Inchworm or Spanworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Geometridae, and they are excellent twig mimics.  What you have mistaken for eggs are actually the pupae of parasitoid Chalcid Wasps.  Here is a similarly parasitized Inchworm on BugGuide and here is an image of the Chalcid Wasp that emerged, also on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Hornet in NYC?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brooklyn, NY
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 09:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was on the outside of our window in Brooklyn. It was huge. I held a ruler up to it and it was 2 inches. It looked like some sort of bee, wasp, or hornet….
How you want your letter signed:  Tommy

Cicada Killer

Dear Tommy,
Just because you live in the city does not mean there is no wildlife.  This impressive wasp is a Cicada Killer.  Cicada Killers are not dangerously aggressive towards humans, though males which lack stingers will defend territory by buzzing any perceived threat.  The female Cicada Killer does have a stinger that she uses to sting and paralyze Cicadas to provide food for her brood.

Awesome! Thanks so much for taking the time to identify this for me. Have a great rest of the day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination