From the yearly archives: "2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this??
Location: Kansas City MIssouri
January 2, 2017 5:25 am
What is this?! I live in Kansas City MO! I found this bug on my carpet floor and I’ve done tons of research on google images but I still can’t find out what this is! It’s small with a hard round back! Help!
Signature: However!

Spider Beetle

Spider Beetle

The Spider Beetle is a common household pest that will infest stored foods in the pantry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Blantyre, Malawi
January 3, 2017 2:01 am
Hi,
Found this bug on my outdoor sofa today and never seen anything like it before. Can’t find it online as of yet and no one on local expat Facebook group had any suggestions.
It’s middle of summer here and rainy season so pretty hot, humid and wet.
Related bug to bottom of the garden and it seemed pretty docile. It’s about 7cm long and 4cm across abdomen.
Thanks,
Tammy
Signature: Cheers

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Tammy,
This is a Weevil in the family Curculionidae, but we are not able to provide you with a species name.  There are several similar looking individuals on the Beetles of Africa site.

Hi Damien,
Thanks very much for prompt reply. Someone replied to my Facebook post that it looked like a Lily Weevil.
Never thought I’d be that interested in a bug until I saw the weevil today. Always thought they were tiny things that got into your flour and rice.
Almost 40 and I’ve learnt something new today, thanks.
Cheers,
Tammy

Ed. Note:  There is no Damien on our staff.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly in Baja California, Mexico.
Location: Baja California, Mexico, southeast coast.
January 2, 2017 10:10 pm
I just submitted a butterfly about 20 minutes before this one. It was the wrong picture. This is the butterfly that my brother took a picture of in Baja California, Mexico, southeast coast, on January 1st. We researched it for a while but could not identify it. Wondering if it is immature.
Sorry for the wrong picture last time.
Signature: Dan in Nevada

Brushfooted Butterfly

Blackened Bluewing Butterfly

Dear Dan,
The best we can provide at this time is a family identification.  This is a Brushfooted Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, and we could not find it listed on the Butterflies and Moths of North America site, which leads us to believe it is probably a mainland species that has strayed to the coast of Baja.  We suspect one of our readers will provide us with a species name and a link very soon.

Update:  January 4, 2017
We received a comment that this is a Blackened Bluewing,
Myscelia cyananthe, a species that appears to have much variation.  This individual on iNaturalist looks similar, but images on Butterflies of America and BugGuide look different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant/Caterpillar Crossbreed!
Location: Napa, Calfornia
December 29, 2016 8:35 pm
My wife found this insect on the floor of our kitchen while sweeping. My best guess is that an ant (or termite) and a caterpillar had a forbidden love affair that resulted in this unusual creature. Dark, flat head and thorax, six legs, long mottled abdomen that has small hairs on it, large jaws. When it moves it walks with its legs, and the long abdomen expands and contracts like an caterpillar to keep up, though it moves very rapidly. I’ve lived my whole life in California and never seen an insect like it. In addition, we are in the middle of winter, so a very unusual time to find a new insect. You will impress me indeed if you know what this is.
Signature: Jesse

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Dear Jesse,
Based on this BugGuide image, this is a beneficial, predatory, Snakefly larva, and we think the adult Snakefly is much more unusual looking than is the larval form.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Koringkriek
Location: 25 km before Colesberg area
December 27, 2016 12:48 pm
We found this koring krieket at our overnight stay coming back from Betties Bay.
Signature: Hendrik

Koringkriek

Koringkriek

Dear Hendrik,
Your Koringkriek image is a marvelous documentation of this South African Katydid.  According to Piotr Nakrecki of The Smaller Majority:  “Despite their bulky appearance and scary-looking armature, these wonderful katydids are, like most insects, completely harmless. Their spikes and horns are nothing more than protection against birds and lizards, and can only be used to make their body more difficult to swallow – they cannot jab, poke, or cut anybody with their armor. The katydids’ only other defense is reflexive bleeding, quite similar to that seen in oil beetles that I recently wrote about. But unlike the beetles, whose blood contains deadly cantharidin, that of the katydids is not toxic. And, in contrast to other katydids who sometimes try to nibble you if handled, armored katydids never, ever bite, no matter how roughly they are treated.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth identification
Location: Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
December 28, 2016 2:15 am
Dear Bugman,
I am a teacher in Jeddah Saudi Arabia, at the British International School. We collected some caterpillars that pupated under the soil. One has emerged and we would like to know what the species is please. We think they are Hawk Moth, maybe deaths head? There were 2 species of caterpillar one green and one brown. I do not know which caterpillar this moth has come from, as I had one of each colour in this container. Any help would be most appreciated.
Signature: Mrs Anne Kendrick

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Dear Anne,
You are correct.  This magnificent specimen is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination