From the yearly archives: "2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual pink bug in Johannesburg South Africa
Location: South Africa, Johannesburg
January 4, 2017 1:24 pm
Hi, love your site thank you for the interesting and informative info you post. I live in the country side just outside Johannesburg, South Africa. It is mid summer here and my son noticed this very unusual bug on the wall in the house. At first we thought it was one bug which had a an upper pink portion with a black end disguised to look like a head too but when we out it in a bottle to take it outside we noticed that it was in fact two bugs and the pink bug was pushing a half digested black. If out its anterior end! Can’t find any info on this and was hoping you could tell is what this bug is?
Signature: Tracy

Newly Metamorphosed Stink Bug might be Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Tracy,
The albino-like coloration of this Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an indication that it just emerged from its cast off nymphal exoskeleton.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive, exotic species originally from Asia that has spread across North America in a very short period of time.

Retraction:  January 19, 2017
Though this is a newly metamorphosed Stink Bug, we cannot state for certain that it is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  Thanks to Curious Girl for pointing out to us that there are no known reports of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs in South Africa.  The Invasive Species Compendium does not list sightings in South Africa.  We based our identification on the striped antennae which are distinctive in the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  This may be a first reported sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail Catterpillar
Location: New Delhi India
January 4, 2017 4:55 am
Hi,
You’ve been very helpful till now, i found this fat big caterpillar, i think it is a swallowtail, but which species ?
thank you kindly
Signature: Aditi

Oleander Hawkmoth Hornworm

Dear Aditi,
This is not a Swallowtail Caterpillar, and it is not even a Butterfly Caterpillar, but rather a Hawkmoth Caterpillar, commonly called a Hornworm.  It is an Oleander Hawkmoth Hornworm.  It will mature into an Oleander Hawkmoth, so we are speculating there was an oleander shrub nearby.  The species is not found without oleander.

Hey Daniel,
I figured after sending you a request, as i was googling more caterpillars with black markings, we have Yellow Oleander trees in access. Thanks,
Aditi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: (Miami) Weird spider looks like it has 4 legs because it holds them together. What is this?
Location: Miami Florida
January 3, 2017 1:16 pm
I’ve lived in Florida most of my entire life. I’ve never seen anything like this! My fiance is currently in Miami and he snapped these photos. He guessed it was a golden orb weaver of some sorts, but I think not. WHAT in the world is this?
Signature: Sara

Silver Argiope

Dear Sara,
The Silver Argiope is a relatively common, harmless Orbweaver in its range, including Southern states like Florida, Texas and California, through Central America and into South America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Citrusdal, Çape town, south africa
Location: Citrusdal south africa
December 30, 2016 11:03 pm
Hi. Got home and this guy came with. Just wondering if he’s dangerous as we go to the same spot annually !!
Signature: Steven

Solifugid

Dear Steven,
This Solifugid is commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion in parts of North America, where our native individuals are much smaller than African or Middle Eastern individuals.  Like spiders and scorpions, Solifugids are Arachnids, but unlike their venomous relatives, Solifugids do not contain venom or poison, but they do have powerful mandibles that can draw blood if a bite occurs.  Large Middle Eastern Solifugids are known as Camel SpidersISpot uses the common name Roman on several of its postings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Koring kriek
Location: South africa thabazimbi
December 31, 2016 2:27 pm
Hello mr bugman .
Can you please confim if this is a koring kriek
Signature: Za kriek

African Jerusalem Cricket

African Jerusalem Cricket

Dear Za kriek,
The Koringkriek and your insect are both Longhorned Orthopterans, but they are in different families.  Your individual is an African Jerusalem Cricket in the genus
Sia based on images we located on iSpot.  According to iSpot, the family is known as Sand Crickets or Sandkrieke.

Aaa great stuff thank you for the effort

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon Identification
Location: Tecumseh, MI
January 1, 2017 12:22 pm
I have found three cocoons of a type, which I have never seen before in my yard. I raise butterflies and moths and am familiar with the cocoons of species which I usually see in my yard. I have included a picture of two of the cocoons. All of them were on plants on the South side of my house. One was on a rose bush, another on a Ninebark bush – both of these were out in the open. The third was buried in some Gaillardia which had died back for the Winter. These would have been formed very late in the Fall – probably in November. In the picture the front of the cocoon is pictured on the left. You can see the shape and that it has ridges from top to bottom, which go all the way around. The right side of the picture shows how the cocoon is attached to the plant. Just one small strip at the top holds it on. The bottom of the cocoon is a very light tan and also has ridges. The texture is almost like styrofoam. I live in Southeast lower Michigan Latitude/Longitude 42.0039, -83.9449. If this is something I have never seen, I would like to over winter the cocoons in my garage. Thank you for any information, which you can give me.
Signature: Jan Graves

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jan,
This is not a cocoon.  It is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis and come spring, several hundred hatchlings should emerge.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for your prompt reply. The links which you supplied definitely depict what I found.  I will leave them where they are and hope that I am  lucky enough to see some of the little Preying Mantis when they emerge.
Jan Graves

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination