From the yearly archives: "2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ant or wasp family?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ludlow, Vermont
Date: 12/16/2017
Time: 03:27 PM EDT
Curious as to what this is, having never seeing one before!
How you want your letter signed:  Gary Stevens

Oil Beetle

Dear Gary,
Though many folks mistake them for queen ants, this is actually an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month when our editorial staff is away on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what kind of jumping spider is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt Hamilton, Santa Clara County, CA
Date: 11/28/2017
Time: 10:33 PM EDT
Found this cutie on my car after a stop near a marshy lake in July. Pretty sure it’s a jumping spider (they have the BEST faces!), but one I’m not familiar with. What species is it? Male or female?
How you want your letter signed:  JD Moore

Jumping Spider

Dear JD Moore,
This is a really good looking Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but unfortunately, we don’t recognize the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a comment.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month when our editorial staff will be away on holiday.

Jumping Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Dakota
Date: 12/16/2017
Time: 08:28 PM EDT
We found this bug in our dogs water dish. Can you please tell me what it might be?
How you want your letter signed:  Alisha

Two Spotted Stink Bug

Dear Alisha,
This distinctively marked insect is a Two Spotted Stink Bug, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “originally a western species that spread eastward following its principal prey, the Colorado Potato Beetle” and “each individual is capable of destroying an average of 231.5 Colorado potato beetle eggs during its nymphal development and 150 to 200 larvae during its lifetime.”  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month when our editorial staff will be taking a holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  catapillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston Area
Date: 12/07/2017
Time: 05:27 PM EDT
A friend of mine has come across these and can’t ID them. Any help would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  anything will do

Eight Spotted Forrester Caterpillar

This is the caterpillar of an Eight Spotted Forrester, which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of grape (Vitis spp.), peppervine (Ampelopsis spp.), and Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia).”   We are postdating your submission to go live later in the month when our editorial staff is on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eggbound California Mantid
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  November 11, 2017
We have been posting images of the female California Mantis that lived on our porch light for much of the early autumn season, including the 25,000th Posting on our site.  She continued to thrive on the insects attracted to the porch light, and three weeks later we posted an image of her devouring a mature Bush Katydid.  Two weeks later, we arrived home and she was not on the light, but she was perched below on the top of the broom handle, but something was clearly wrong.  Her abdomen had burst and we saw what we at first thought might be larvae of a parasite, but we later presumed were her unlaid eggs, but what caused this trauma?  Perhaps she fell from the light and burst open when she hit the ground.  We suspected she would soon die, and we put her on a camelia in the garden.  When we checked on her progress later in the evening, we found her bent double, licking her wound.

Wounded Female California Mantis

The next morning the Argentine Ants had discovered her and were crawling on her legs.  We knew she would lose that encounter, so we moved her to a potted willow where she lived a few more days and eventually vanished, only to be discovered clinging to the side of the house, dead, her eggs never laid.  We put her body in a protected location and we wonder if though unlaid, perhaps her eggs might hatch next spring, protected from the elements by her body instead of a frothy ootheca.

Injured Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID please
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Brazil
Date: 11/27/2017
Time: 06:45 AM EDT
Please can you ID the three insects on the enclosed enclosed photos please
How you want your letter signed:  GP

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear GP,
The yellow and black beetle is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae, and we found a matching image on FlickR, but alas, it is only identified to the family level.  In the future, please limit your identification requests to a single species per submission.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site later in the month while our editorial staff is away for the holidays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination