From the yearly archives: "2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  False-eyed caterpillar in San Diego County, California
Geographic location of the bug:  Oceanside, San Diego County, California
August 25, 2017  4:27 PM
Hi! I found this little critter outside my front door after I was away for a while. (There’s a large tree beyond the sidewalk, so it could’ve easily fallen there.) It didn’t want to move, so I had plenty of time to get a good shot.
It had green/grayish skin. It seemed that it was trying to change its skin color to match the pavement below it. I left and came back to find no trace of it. I wonder if a bird spotted it…
Anyway, what kind of caterpillar is this? I haven’t seen it before and it has false eyes that extend further inward than the ones I’ve seen pictured on this site. I’m on USA’s west coast, in Southern California. (We also have green jewel-scarab beetles that fly around in the daytime here. Not sure if that helps.)
Signature:  Lightwulf

Western Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lightwulf,
Based on your location, we are leaning towards this being a Western Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar, because of this BugGuide image.  BugGuide states:  “Larvae very similar to those of Pale Tiger Swallowtail, but black pupil of false eye-spot larger, and yellow spot inside eyespot entirely separated from it, not just notched.”  BugGuide also states:  “Larvae feed on foliage of deciduous trees, including cottonwood, birch, elms, willow, alder, sycamore, and aspen.”  When it was still feeding, this Western Tiger Swallowtail caterpillar was green, but as the time for transformation into a chrysalis approached, it darkened to the brown color your images depict, though some individuals turn orange.  Caterpillars often travel away from the food source to find an appropriate place to undergo metamorphosis.  The similar looking Two Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar is another possibility for your critter’s identity.

Western Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:? Beetle in Teton NP
Geographic location of the bug: Teton NP Death Canyon Trail at the overlook, Wyoming
We were hiking August 20, At the overlook, a friend spotted this bug on his leg. I’m sorry the photo isn’t sharper.
Signature:  D Austin

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear D. Austin,
The white scutellum indicates that your Longhorned Beetle is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and we verified on BugGuide that its range does extend to Alaska.

Thank you so much for your quick response. I wanted to clarify that this beetle was found in Teton National Park in Wyoming. I’m assuming that the range of this beetle, the Whitespotted Sawyer, includes Wyoming.
Thank you,
Debra Austin
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s That Bug? turns fifteen today!!!
Dear faithful readers,
What’s That Bug? has several dates that we acknowledge.  We started as a column in the zine American Homebody in May 1998, and when the now defunct website American Homebody went live in 2001, we had our first presence on the internet.  See the history of American Homebody on Lisa Anne Auerbach’s site. We existed in that format for a year, and then on August 25, 2002, we registered the www.whatsthatbug.com domain, and this was our first posting as a unique website.  There was no image with that submission, and we found an image from the internet to use.  That launch date for our site predates the popularity of cellular telephones with the ability to take images.  Early submissions to our site required actual digital cameras to provide images.  Through the years, our mission has always been to educate people to appreciate and tolerate the lower beasts.  Interestingly, Longhorn Beetles, the category of that first posting, is still the most populated category on our site with 1012 postings as of right now.  Here is a gorgeous image of a Banded Alder Borer from our archives.

Banded Alder Borer (from our archives)

Fanmail
Congratulations dear Daniel!  Your site is so fascinating and you have maintained it faithfully and you have followers all over the world.  Thank you for keeping us intrigued.
Best,
Monique

Daniel,
WTB is a great resource for me, particularly as it’s imbued with Daniel’s humor, as well as his knowledge.
Particularly fun is the Bug Love section 😀
Daniel’s beautiful book, “The Curious World of Bugs”,
( Ours is signed to Jessica with the admonition: “Do good work on the dark continent; and Don’t let the Creechies bite”)
should be on everyone’s shelf, as far as I’m concerned!

Congratulations on keeping us up to date for so long on bugs far and wide, Daniel!
Here is a photo of Ariadne, who will be 32 next month.
Sending her kind regards with mine!
Clare

Ariadne the Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Montgomery county Pennsylvania
August 24, 2017 7:24 am
Trying to figure out what this bug is.
Signature: Curious chick

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Curious chick,
This is a Squash Vine Borer, a moth that mimics a wasp for protection against predators.  Larvae are borers in the stems of squash and related plants that can destroy a plant or drastically reduce its yield.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What am I?
Location: South Jersey (August 2017)
August 24, 2017 9:29 am
Found this lounging on my picnic table. Looks like it’s giving a piggyback ride to another.
Signature: Jennifer Pierce

Mating Wheel Bugs

Dear Jennifer,
These are mating Wheel Bugs, the largest predatory Assassin Bugs in North America.  The angle of your image does not highlight the coglike protrusion on the thorax of adult Wheel Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Summer Spiders from the Italian Mountains
Location:  Dolomites Mountains, Italy
August 24, 2017 1:06 PM
Dear bugman,
I just came back from a trip to the Dolomites mountains in northern Italy. I had many encounters with spiders. I took a picture of some of them, hoping that you could help me identifying them.
Can you?
Thanks!
Saverio
PS: I have better quality files if needed.

Harvestman

Dear Saverio,
Though they resemble Spiders, most of your images are actually Harvestmen or Daddy-Long-Legs in the order Opiliones.  Unlike Spiders, they do not have venom.  It appears you have three different species represented.

Harvestman

Harvestman

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination