Subject:  Bugs on bugs.
Geographic location of the bug:  Vernon, British Columbia, Canada
Date: 10/30/2017
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Upon taking some photographs of a Granulated Carabid, I noticed that there was a smaller individual on the subject. Locating several other Carabids in the area, it was found that several individuals had these unknown hitchhikers, with numbers ranging between 0 and 4.
How you want your letter signed:  Scott

Mite on Ground Beetle

Dear Scott,
The creature you found on this Granulated Carabid is a Mite, and there are phoretic or hitchhiking mites that use beetles as a means of transportation.  Phoretic Mites are commonly found on Sexton Beetles in great numbers and the Mites take advantage of the flying Sexton Beetles to transport them to new locations to find food.  We know of no instances of phoretic Mites using Ground Beetles for transportation, so it is entirely possible that this particular Mite might have a more ominous reason for being on the Granulated Carabid you found.  Ground Beetle Macro Photography has an example of a Mite found on a Ground Beetle but there is no explanation.  This might be a phoretic Mite, but we haven’t the expertise with Mites to be certain.

Granulated Carabid

Mite

Location: Vernon, British Columbia, Canada

2 Responses to Mite on Ground Beetle

  1. AlexW, extreme entomophile says:

    Hopefully, someone will notice this.

    I have recently caught some small carabids for captivity, and there were similar-looking ones walking on the ground and sitting on them. An earwig was also found running around with a cluster on its back. I am under the impression that parasitic mites move very little and stay near their feeding spots, though I could be wrong. The ones I observed seemed to have antenniform front legs, suggesting that they are highly mobile.

    That no instances of phoretic mites were known to you on ground beetles is not much of a surprise, since the “bug” world is largely undocumented.

  2. AlexW, extreme entomophile says:

    Hopefully, someone will notice this.

    I have recently caught some small carabids for captivity, and there were similar-looking ones walking on the ground and sitting on them. An earwig was also found running around with a cluster on its back. I am under the impression that parasitic mites move very little and stay near their feeding spots, though I could be wrong. The ones I observed seemed to have antenniform front legs, suggesting that they are highly mobile.

    That no instances of phoretic mites were known to you on ground beetles is not much of a surprise, since the “bug” world is largely undocumented.

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