From the monthly archives: "September 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiky Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North Vietnam
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Today, we found this caterpillar. Rather, it found us. It stung of us in the head, and hurt like hell. The locals assured us, that it wasn’t dangerous, just unpleasant. What can you tell us about that nasty fellow?
How you want your letter signed:  The three adventurers

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear The three adventurers,
This is a gorgeous image of a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We will attempt a species identification.  In the meantime, here is an image from Creative Photography that was also taken in Vietnam, but which is most likely a different species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black & Orange Banded w/Red Head
Geographic location of the bug:  Tulsa, Ok
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 10:34 AM EDT
I’ve seen photos of the Banded Net-Wing Beetle, but all of those have a black head. This bug has a red head. Is it different or maybe a different gender?
How you want your letter signed:  Gloria Famer

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Gloria,
While your critter resembles a Banded Net-Winged Beetle,
it is a different species.  As a matter of fact, it is not even a beetle.  This is a Large Milkweed Bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, a species almost always found on milkweed.  Since Large Milkweed Bugs have mouths designed to pierce and suck, not to chew, the eaten leaf can be attributed to something else.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A beautiful green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Arkansas
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 11:10 PM EDT
I saw an interesting bug on my porch. Some type of beetle perhaps. Just wondering what it is.
Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Melody

Bumelia Borer

Dear Melody,
This gorgeous beetle is a Bumelia Borer,
Plinthocoelium suaveolens.  According to BugGuide:  “Large, metallic green, bronze, or blue (highly variable). Femora red.” 

Bumelia Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is the name of this moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  David, Panamá (Central América)
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 09:20 PM EDT
Hi. can you please help me to identify this moth… well or at least I think is a moth
How you want your letter signed:  MR

Mating Sphinx Moths: Adhemarius gannascus

Dear MR,
They are a pair of mating Sphinx Moths or Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, and we believe we have correctly identified them as
Adhemarius gannascus thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states they: ” have been taken at lights in every month of the year in Costa Rica” which probably means they fly year round in Panama as well.  The species is also pictured on iNaturalist.

Hi Daniel.
Impressive, that was fast. Thank you very much to help me to identify this beautiful moth and his mate

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Niagara Falls, Ontario
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 12:06 PM EDT
What is this wasp dragging a spider across the deck? The iridescent blue wings and striped body, rusty colored legs and eyes are beautiful. It was very fast but I was able to get a very short video of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Dawn,
This is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and female members of the family hunt and paralyze Spider to feed to the developing brood.  Your species,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, does not have a species specific common name.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids” meaning the Spider in your image is most likely a Wolf Spider.

Spider Wasp and Prey

Thank you Daniel. It is extraordinary that you replied so quickly and it is much appreciated. I will write a short story for the Bert Miller Nature Club’s fall Rambler newsletter and give reference to What’s That Bug and the information you provided.
Sincerely,
Dawn Pierrynowski

Spider Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Franklinville, NC in edge of woods
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 03:41 PM EDT
Would appreciate help in identifying this caterpillar. Its body appears light purple, almost see thru. I’m thinking the pink is its innards. I love bugs and all insects and am curious about this one. It is so distinctive and different colored than most. Appreciate your help. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Lex Bakarich

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Lex,
Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus
Heterocampa like your individual frequently change color from green to pink or purple just prior to pupation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination