From the monthly archives: "September 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying insect covered in white hairs
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeast Florida
Date: 09/30/2017
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
I’ve been living in Florida all my life but this is a first. I did not kill it or disturb it.I just took a picture it.I was at a park and it was resting on a fence post.Can you tell me the name of this thing and what it does?
How you want your letter signed:  George M

Antlion

Dear George,
This is an Antlion in the genus
Vella.  The common name refers to the larvae, also called Doodle Bugs, that live in sandy soil at the bottom of a pit where they wait with only their mandibles exposed, ready to eat anything that tumbles into the pit. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar Chiang Mai Thailand
Geographic location of the bug:  Chiang Mai Thailand
Date: 09/29/2017
Time: 02:44 AM EDT
Would like to know what is it called and is it poisonous / itchy. Do want to try. Quick searches on the web look like Dice Moth Caterpillar but a different color? Rhanidophora Ridens.
Found it on leaves of a small bush near a creek. September 29th 2017  temperature here is 31 to 24c tail end of rainy season.
How you want your letter signed:  🙂

I think I found it.
Tinolius eburneigutta
Hope that save you some time.
Best regards,
Eric

Noctuoid Caterpillar: Tinolius eburneigutta

Dear Eric,
Your images are gorgeous, and so is the caterpillar.  Thanks for getting back to us with your identification of
Tinolius eburneigutta.  We found it pictured on Insects in Indian Agroecosystems, pBase and on Project Noah.

Noctuoid Caterpillar: Tinolius eburneigutta

Noctuoid Caterpillar: Tinolius eburneigutta

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Hampton roads VA
Date: 09/29/2017
Time: 07:03 PM EDT
Would like to know a little more about this bug.
How you want your letter signed:  Syed

Tersa Sphinx

Dear Syed,
This sleek moth is a Tersa Sphinx.

Tersa Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  fat, pink, and roly poly
Geographic location of the bug:  vermont, usa
Date: 09/29/2017
Time: 04:50 PM EDT
I work at a childcare center on the vermont-new hampshire border, and i’ve seen a bunch of unusual bugs on the playground this year. i wish i’d found this site earlier, because it would have been able to answer a lot of questions for the curious kids- and their teacher!
I found this guy just crawling around on the ground in the bark mulch and i’ve never seen anything like it before. It was pretty warm earlier this week for late september, could that have anything to do with it?
thank you so much for all your hard work!
How you want your letter signed:

Pre-Pupal Drab Prominent Caterpillar

Dear Molly,
Your caterpillar bears an uncanny resemblance to a Mottled Prominent Moth Caterpillar we just posted, except that individual is green and yours is pink.  Many caterpillars change color just prior to pupation, and that pre-pupal state is often a change in color from green to pink.  We located this image of a pink Mottled Prominent Caterpillar on BugGuide and we consider that an anfirmation of our suspicion, but, closer inspection has us doubting that since your individual is lacking the rear-end projections visible in this BugGuide image and our own image. We still believe this is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar from the family Notodontidae.  We now believe, based on this BugGuide image, that it is a Drab Prominent Caterpillar,
Misogada unicolor.  According to BugGuide, the:  “larvae feed on cottonwood and sycamore” and “larvae can be found on the underside of cottonwood and sycamore leaves April-September.”

Pre-Pupal Drab Prominent Caterpillar

Thank you so much! The kids were all very fascinated, even if some of them didn’t completely understand. Keep up the good work!

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bu Jiminy, it’s a huge cricket!
Geographic location of the bug:  Borneo
Date: 09/29/2017
Time: 06:33 PM EDT
Dear Bug-dudes, on the road up to Mt. Kinabalu I foolishly picked this monster up to get a size comparison photo – it chomped the end of my bird-flipping finger and drew ridiculous amounts of blood … for a cricket!! I guess it’s about 3 1/2″ long.  A fantastic beast indeed, as are so many on this amazing island.  I’m very surprised that my googling has not revealed the animals true identity – help would be appreciated.
Cheers
How you want your letter signed:  Paul Prior

Large Ensiferan from Borneo

Dear Paul,
This looks to us like a close relative of North American Potato Bug, or a King Cricket from Australia or Parktown Prawn from South Africa.  We located an image on ShutterStock, but alas, it is only identified as a “giant cricket in Sabah, Borneo.”  We hope to have a better identification for you soon.  We will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki.

Possibly Sia incisa

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification
Hi Daniel,
This looks like Sia, possibly S. incisa, a distant relative of North American Jerusalem crickets.
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Ed. Note:  We found a matching image on Wikiwand.

Large Ensiferan

Thanks guys, this is brilliant. Certainly looks pretty close to the pics I see on the internet. No mention of size and the map doesn’t show Borneo, but perhaps there’s another larger species occurring on that island (which so many examples of “gigantism”!).
Paul
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs in backyard
Geographic location of the bug:  Torrance California
Date: 09/28/2017
Time: 07:31 PM EDT
I put fly traps up in backyard to help with flies around my dogs and I end up catching these bugs instead. I just want to make sure these are not mosquitos since my dogs and myself are outdoors in backyard often.  Thank you for any info you may give.
How you want your letter signed:  currious mom

Long Legged Flies

Dear currious mom,
These Long Legged Flies in the family Dolichopodidae are beneficial predators in the garden, though they are only able to eat the smallest of prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination