From the monthly archives: "August 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Exoskeleton of a bug with fangs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Yorkshire, England
August 25, 2017
I found what appears to be an exoskeleton of a bug with fangs under a box in my house. It measures approximately 1.9cm in length and 1cm in width. Any help on what it may be will be much appreciated.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  You’re doing a great job!

Rodent Skull

This is an endoskeleton, not an exoskeleton, and it is not from a bug.  We believe this is a rodent skull.

Rodent Skull

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a type of dung beetle..?
Geographic location of the bug:  St.Louis MO
August 25, 2017
Sitting on my back patio a little west of St.Louis MO when this guy decided to join… Couldn’t see real well at first since my lights were off and it was dark out… thought it was a June bug but when I grabbed it I realized it was quite a bit bigger than a June bug snapped some pics and let it go out by my garden… it was really strong and had pretty unique 8 white or pearl collered lines 4 on the rear of each wing covers… I can’t find anything online that looks like it please help identify…thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Tim H

Dung Beetle

Dear Tim,
This is certainly a Dung Beetle, and we believe based on this BugGuide image, that it is
Dichotomius carolinus.  According to BugGuide:  “A big, black or blackish-brown, and bulky dung beetle. Note prominent striations on elytra, though these are often partly filled with dirt. Pronotum distinctively shaped. Vertex of head has short, blunt horn in male.”

Dung Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Walayar
August 26, 2017 7:19 AM
I just wanna know it’s name
How you want your letter signed:  No

Blister Beetle

Dear No,
This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, possibly
Mylabris pustulata based on images posted to Encyclopedia of Life where it states:  “Mylabris pustulata is a species of blister beetle belonging to the Meloidae family found in South Asia. Adults feed mainly on flowers from a wide range of plant families. The first larval instar is an active triungulin form that is a predator of soft insects such as aphids. While the young are often beneficial to crops by suppressing other plant feeders, the adults can be a problem when present in large numbers. Flower feeding leads to lower yield and this can be a problem in some leguminous crops. They are however easily controlled by manual collection.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Skipper in Montgomery County Pa 8/26/17
Geographic location of the bug:  Upper Hanover Township
August 26, 2017 12:48 PM
I saw this very small skipper in NW Montgomery County. Photos are clear enough, but bad angles.
How you want your letter signed:  Joseph L Greco Jr

Sachem Skipper

Hi Joseph,
We must admit that we have trouble with exact species identifications on Skippers, but we feel confident this is a Grass Skipper in the family Hesperinae.  Based on this and other BugGuide images, it might be the Delaware Skipper,
Anatrytone logan.  We love your image with the partially opened wings.  The patterns remind us of a Rorschach test.

Sachem Skipper

Thanks. Delaware was my guess as well. The underwing is closest to what I see in Glassberg.
As for the one wing, I got lucky. It’s almost in focus too. But it is weird to see a skipper like that.
Joe Greco

Upper Hanover 
Montgomery County 
Update:  September 1, 2017
Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we are further clarifying that this is a Sachem, which matches this BugGuide image.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bright red caterpillar
Location: Southern Arizona ( Santa Cruz county)
August 25, 2017 7:58 pm
I have been noticing these bright red caterpillars during my evening walks.
They are on a plant that I have not found on our property, so that may be their host plant
Do you know what is caterpillar is ?
Signature: Len Nowak ( Salero Ranch )

Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Len,
This is a Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on
Aristolochia species. These include ‘Pipevine’ or ‘Dutchman’s Pipe’, Aristolochia species (tomentosa, durior, reticulata, californica), as well as Virginia Snakeroot, Aristolochia serpentaria. Larvae presumably take up toxic secondary compounds (including Aristolochic acid) from their hostplant. Both larvae and adults are believed toxic to vertebrate predators, and both have aposematic (warning) coloration.”  The adult Pipevine Swallowtail is sometimes called a Blue Swallowtail and it is a gorgeous butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eggplant leaf eater
Geographic location of the bug:  Kenosha WI
August 26, 2017 1:36 PM
Can you identify this pest eating eggplant leaves in our Kenosha, WI garden?
How you want your letter signed:  Phil Wheeler

Colorado Potato Beetle Larvae

Dear Phil,
These are either Colorado Potato Beetle Larvae or a closely related species.  According to BugGuide:  “Potatoes and related plants” and eggplant and potato are in the same family.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination