From the monthly archives: "August 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found by the side of a Canadian Lake
Location: Lake Eduard, Quebec
July 31, 2017 2:23 pm
Hi
If you’ve got time my 4 year old son Leo would love to know what this bug is.
It is about 3cm long and he found it on the rocks by the side of the lake shore.
Signature: Leo Taylor

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Leo,
This is a Dragonhunter naiad, the aquatic nymph of the dragonfly species
Hagenius brevistylus. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf-like insect?
Location: Ancaster, Ontario, Canada
July 31, 2017 7:21 pm
Hi,
I was wondering if you could help me identify this bug. There were two of them, and they are quite strange looking. I’ve tried a Google image search but haven’t found anything.
Thanks
Signature: Mary-Ann

Jagged Ambush Bug

Dear Mary-Ann,
Your Jagged Ambush Bug images are awesome.  Jagged Ambush Bugs are stealth predators that depend upon camouflage to help them capture winged prey, often much larger than themselves.

Jagged Ambush Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aquatic bug?!
Location: Glacial river, base of mt Rainier
July 31, 2017 8:24 pm
Hello! We were out playing in a very cold glacial river at the base of Mt Rainier in Washington state and came across these guys today. There were hundreds of them on rocks in the water, but only a few this sprawled out and large outside the water.
Signature: Alexa

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Alexa,
Your images document two different, unrelated aquatic insects.  The image of the one “sprawled out and large outside the water” is actually the exuvia or cast-off exoskeleton of a Stonefly, and the “hundreds of them on rocks in the water” are Caseworms, the larvae or naiads of Caddisflies.  Larval Caddisflies are known as Caseworms and according to BugGuide:  “Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.”  The cases on your individuals appear to be constructed using grains of sand or small pebbles.

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Big Poplar Sphinx!
Location: Washington
July 29, 2017 11:45 am
Hello! I live in NW Washington, for the last couple of days this awesome moth that looks like a dead leaf has been hanging out on the door frame. It’s end of July in the mid 70’s-80’s. It’s fairly larger, probably 3″ across. I love seeing cool moths and finding out about them but this one doesn’t quite look like the other sphinx moths I looked up. Thank you!
Signature: Moth Lover

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Moth Lover,
This is not a Big Poplar Sphinx, but it is a Sphinx Moth in the same tribe.  This is
Smerinthus ophthalmica, a species with no common name, and you can read more about it on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  ” S. ophthalmica flies across southern British Columbia and southern Alberta into southwestern Saskatchewan.  In the United States it can be found in Washington, Oregon and northern and central California eastward into Idaho, western Montana, western Wyoming and northern Nevada and northern Utah.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination