From the monthly archives: "August 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  south eastern IL
August 27, 2017 9:36 AM
Your letter to the bugman:  I am wondering what species of mantis this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Female Carolina Mantis

This looks to us like a female Carolina Mantis, Stagmomantis carolina, when compared to this BugGuide image.  The wings of the female fall short of the tip of the abdomen.  Despite its name, the Carolina Mantis has a range that extends over much of the eastern U.S., as BugGuide date indicates.  The native Carolina Mantis is much smaller than Mantid species that have been introduced, and they often fall prey to larger Chinese Mantids and European Mantids.

Female California Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this cool bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hesperia, MI
August 27, 2017 8:47 AM
We found this on our motorhome going through a pre-flight cleaning, but attached is a picture, it’s tail is amazing!
How you want your letter signed:  The schroeder’s

Stump Stabber

Dear Schroeders
This is the largest, and arguably the most impressive, North American parasitoid Ichneumon,
Megarhyssa atrata, commonly called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees that are infested with wood boring Horntail larvae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Southern NH
August 23, 2017 1:31 pm
Can you please tell me what this is? Thanks!
Signature: Brian

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Brian,
Congratulations on witnessing the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird bug with backwards head
Geographic location of the bug :  McKinney Texas
August 26, 2017 9:22 AM
I have no clue what this is
It gave me chills it looks like scifi related
How you want your letter signed:  None

Male Dobsonfly

Dear None,
This is a male Dobsonfly, and we suspect this is a threat position used to intimidate predators.  Those scimitar shaped mandibles look fierce, but they are actually quite useless when it comes to biting humans, so they are harmless.  The mandibles are used by males to impress females and to thwart other males who might be competing for females.  Female Dobsonflies have less impressive looking but more formidable mandibles.

Male Dobsonfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found this critter in the kitchen today.
Geographic location of the bug:  Sheffield, UK
August 26, 2017 12:33 AM
Can you identify this bug.  Sheffield UK
How you want your letter signed:  No

Ichneumon

Dear No,
This is a parasitoid Ichneumon Wasp and there are several pictured on Nature Spot that look similar including
Buathra laborator which is described on Nature Spot as being “Quite a large blackish insect with mainly orange legs. There are other similar species and expert help is needed with identification. ”  Also similar looking is Pimpla rufipes which is described on Nature Spot as being:  “Length about 15 mm. A mainly black species, but with bright orange legs, the hind pair of legs being only slightly larger than the other pairs. The ovipositor of the female is quite thick and short and the ‘waist’ between the thorax and abdomen is also quite short” and “Mainly an autumn species.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Taos NM
August 25, 2017
About 1/4 inch
How you want your letter signed:  Charlie

Ambush Bug

Dear Charlie,
This is one of the strangest images we have ever received of a predatory Ambush Bug.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination