From the monthly archives: "August 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Update on Grass Carrying Wasp from France
Location:  southwest France
August 29, 2017 8:05 AM
Hi Daniel,
Further to recent contacts, I have, at last, managed to get some half decent shots of the grass carrying wasps nesting in our patio table.
They have been pretty active these past few days – maybe the 35+ degree heat has turned them on – but they catch me out every time I have no camera ready. It really is a struggle to film them as they arrive and disappear to their nest(s) in no time at all.
However, the attached pics show one with a small cricket or grasshopper of some description and another close-up or the wasp just landing on the table.
I hope they are of sufficient quality to be of interest. I am still waiting for the shot of the wasp actually ‘doing what it says on the tin’ and carrying a piece of grass to the nest. I have been close a few times and will get it one day, although I figure nesting may well be approaching the end with the impending onset of autumn.
We have also noticed recent activity in the table by what I believe are some form of robber or parasitic wasp. The first one looked VERY like a large horsefly, the subsequent visitors more like a regular small brown wasp. Again, I have not been able to capture them on camera so I can’t ID them any better than that I’m afraid. The interesting thing is that they have been bringing in small crickets and the like, using the same holes as the grass carrying wasps. I don’t know whether they are nesting on their own behalf or feeding the larvae of the GCW’s for the benefit of their own offspring. The two species met on one visit to the nest entrance. The prey was jettisoned and there was an interesting ‘face-off’ with the larger, GCW probably winning on points I would say.
One final note on the GCW – it dropped its cricket on the table before landing at the nest hole and it was clearly evident that the prey was not dead, merely anaesthetised, as there were distinct signs of movement in both the legs and the ovipositor. I have no idea how long it is, following the bite, before they die  but this one didn’t seem to last more than a few minutes before it (seemingly) expired.
Thanks as ever for all you do to enlighten us on these matters. My wife thinks I spend an “unreasonable” amount of time perusing the site but she’s quite getting into our little wasp friends and alerts me now when one is ‘incoming’. There’s hope yet!
All the best,
Robin

Grass Carrying Wasp with Prey

Dear Robin,
Your diligence has paid off.  We love the image of the Grass Carrying Wasp with its Tree Cricket prey.

Grass Carrying Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lime Hawk Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Tappahannock VA.. USA
August 29, 2017 6:07 AM
I spotted this moth at the entrance to a busy store in Tappahannock VA.. Northern Neck of VA.. I picked it up and released it in a nearby wooded area.. is it a Lime Hawk Moth ??
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon Fine

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Sharon,
The Lime Hawkmoth is a European species.  We did receive a report once of a Lime Hawkmoth in Pennsylvania, but your individual is a Pandorus Sphinx, a native species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What species of Mantis is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, WV
August 29, 2017 6:29 AM
I found this little guy trapped in a spider web while working on a rooftop air conditioner.
I’ve never seen a mantis like this on, very tiny (about the size of my thumbnail) was mostly black with yellow/green spots around. Had a bumpy abdomen and long slender neck.
How you want your letter signed:  Jacob

Mantispid

Dear Jacob,
This is not a Mantis.  It is an unrelated insect that has evolved to look similar to a Preying Mantis because it has a similar hunting style, using raptorial front legs to capture and hold prey while feeding.  This is a Mantispid or Mantisfly, and we believe it is
Leptomantispa pulchella.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chinese Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmette Illinois
August 28, 2017 7:57 AM
I believe this to be a Chinese Mantis. I thought he was quite photogenic.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin Weidman

Immature Chinese Mantis

Dear Karin,
This Mantis is immature and identification of immature individuals is often more difficult than the identification of mature adults.  The wing pads do appear to have a green edge, so we believe your identification of an immature Chinese Mantis is correct.

Immature Chinese Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cicada
Geographic location of the bug:  Dominican Republic, Santiago
August 28, 2017  10:28 AM
I had to,post this cicada, most cicadas in DR are dark, this is the first time I see a light colored one.
Do you know the genus and species?
How you want your letter signed:  Suzette

Cicada

Hi Suzette,
I am also including the image you sent in a previous email of a dark Cicada.  The spotting on the wings in both individuals looks similar, so it is possible there is some color variation within a single species.  The markings on the lighter Cicada look similar to the North American genus
Tibicen, commonly called the Annual Cicadas.  Unfortunately, there is no good database of Dominican insects available online.

Cicada

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  Orange County, ca
August 28, 2017 12:32 PM
I’m wondering what type these are taking over my plants! There are probably 100 on one bush.
How you want your letter signed:  Anna

Genista Broom Caterpillars

Dear Anna,
You can compare your image to this BugGuide image to verify that you are being troubled by Genista Broom Caterpillars,
Uresiphita reversalis, a species sometimes called a Sophora Worm.  Genista Broom Caterpillars feed on leguminous plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination