From the monthly archives: "July 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Juvenile maybe?
Location: Lupa Masa, east base of Mt.Kinabalu, Sabah
July 29, 2017 2:17 am
Hi.
I happened to find this at 10pm , 28th July 2017.
I checked a lot of images and there are similar ones when googling Borneo huntsman. Thing is, this one is about 3cm in length.
Sorry the photo isn’t great, because my camera is an ancient lumix compact.
Are we looking at a juvenile?
I’ve seen others with similar colour and shape but way bigger.
Thanks
John
Signature: In blood

Huntsman Spider or Wandering Spider?

Dear John,
We are not sure if this is a Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae or a Wandering Spider in the family Ctenidae.

Huntsman Spider or Wandering Spider?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Common Darter
Location: Bristol, UK
July 31, 2017 2:05 am
Hi bugman!
I thought you might like this picture for your archive. It is a male Common Darter – the picture was taken at the same pool I saw the Emperor that you kindly added last week.
Signature: Zoovolunteer

Male Common Darter

Dear Zoovolunteer,
Your image of the male Common Darter,
Sympetrum striolatum, is a marvelous addition to our archives.  According to British Dragonflies:  “Flight Period: July to October (sometimes in May and December)  A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brown above with poorly defined antehumeral stripes and yellow panels on the sides. The eyes are brown above and yellow below. The legs are black with a diagnostic yellow stripe along their length.  Male: becomes a bright orange-red with maturity with small black spots on S8 and S9.  Female: pale, yellowish-brown abdomen often developing red markings along the segment boundaries and medial line as they age.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BIG spider on Kauai!
Location: Powerline Trail, Kauai.
July 31, 2017 5:29 pm
Hi again, here are the photos of the large web spider I saw on Kauai about three weeks ago (see my previous post). It sounds as if it’s similar to the ones that other contributors have seen.
Signature: Malcolm

Argiope avara kauaiensis

Dear Malcolm,
Thanks for sending your images of
Argiope avara kauaiensis, an indigenous harmless, Orbweaver from Kauai.  Thank you for your description of the size of the web in the comment you made:  “I have just returned from Kauai where I saw a huge spider that looked like this. It was at the highest elevation of the Powerline Trail, in a seldom visited area. The spider was enormous, and it was sitting in a web between two trees that must have been at least 25 feet apart. It was the biggest web spider I have ever seen. I have a photo, taken on an overcast day and using a zoom (I didn’t want to get too close!), but I’m having some trouble attaching it.”

Argiope avara kauaiensis


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predation
Location: Sussex County, NJ
July 31, 2017 8:44 am
I witnessed a square-headed wasp (Family Cabronidae, I believe) take down a large syrphid fly this morning and thought I’d share the photos. Also, wondering if you might be able to narrow down my ID on the wasp for me?
The attack was remarkably fast with the wasp landing on the fly and quickly subduing it. Eventually the wasp dropped the fly as it seemed that it was too large for the wasp to carry more than a very short distance. Interestingly, an hour later, the body of the syrphidae was gone – so did it recover or did something else come along and dispose of it? Fascinating.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Square-Headed Wasp and Drone Fly Prey

Dear Deborah,
Thanks for sending in your amazing images that are greatly enhanced by your written observations.  Speculate is the best we can do for the subsequent exploits of the Drone Fly, but we can be certain that it was alive after the encounter.  We would like to speculate that after that spectacular attack, the Square-Headed Wasp partially glided, and partially dragged her prey to her nest to serve as fresh meat for her developing brood.  Of the Square Headed Wasps in the subfamily Crabroninae, BugGuide states:  “Some nest in hollow stems or in abandoned galleries in wood, others burrow in the ground. Prey is mostly flies, but some utilize other insects.”  Exactly a year and two days ago, you submitted a very similar Food Chain image. that appears to be of the same species, both predator and prey, and at that time, we identified the genus as possibly
Ectemnius.  We will look into this more thoroughly.

Square-Headed Wasp and Drone Fly Prey

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for your very informative response!  And forgive my senior moment in forgetting the photo I sent to you last year.
I actually wondered if the wasp had just paralyzed the Drone Fly, or if it was dead.  But it certainly makes sense that it would be alive, especially as it would be a food source for the wasp-kids.  I have a small colony of Great Golden Diggers and frequently see them carrying very large katydids into their nests.
I have found with insects that the more I learn, the more I want to know.  J
Best,
Deborah

You are most welcome Deborah.  We can always depend upon you to send in great images.

Square-Headed Wasp and Drone Fly Prey

Square-Headed Wasp and Drone Fly Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daylight moth?
Location: Helena, Montana
July 31, 2017 11:51 am
Lived in montana all my life. Never seen a moth or butterfly like this one… Doesn’t seem to classify as butterfly or moth clearly.
Reminds me of a cinnabar (red tansy) moth in movement.
Anyone know?
Signature: CandidKlutz

Police Car Moth

Dear Candidklutz,
This diurnal beauty is a Police Car Moth,
Gnophaela vermiculata, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults fly during the day in late summer, July-August (Alberta)” and “Larvae feed on bluebells [lungwort] (Mertensia spp.), puccoon (Lithospermum spp.) and stickseed (Hackelia spp.).  Adults feed during the day on nectar of herbaceous flowers such as thistle (Cirsium spp.) and goldenrod (Solidago spp.)”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Moth in New Mexico
Location: Roswell, NM Chavez County
July 30, 2017 10:56 am
Hi Bugman,
My daughter and I found this beautiful moth at the base of a trashcan at a gas station in Roswell, NM. It just goes to show you can find beautiful things in the most unlikely places. We picked it up and took it a ways down the road and released in some trees. I have experience with silk moths, but this one had a proboscis. I was thinking a type of sphinx moth, but the body didn’t look right. Anyway, Google has let me down and I need help. Thanks for taking a look!
Signature: Trina W
Trina Woodall
Photographer/Owner
TripleDogDare Photography
www.TripleDogDarePhotography.com

Female Northern Giant Flag Moth

Dear Trina,
We are especially happy we wrote back to you to notify you there were no images.  Though we immediately recognized this as a Tiger Moth, we needed to identify the species and we found the Northern Giant Flag Moth,
Dysschema howardi, pictured on the Moth Photographers Group, and we verified its identity on BugGuide were we learned that only females have orange underwings, meaning your individual is a female.  We also learned on BugGuide that this is the only member of the genus found north of Mexico:  “1 sp. n. of Mex. (a second sp. may have strayed once from Mexico).   There are some 90(!) species of Dysschema, mostly in South America.”  The species is also pictured on the Butterflies and Moths of North America site.  Though we have a single posting of the caterpillar of the Northern Giant Flag Moth, your submission is the only image we have in our archives of an adult.

Female Northern Giant Flag Moth

Ed. Note:  This is one of the most beautiful North American moths that has ever been submitted to our site.  It is so incredibly delicate in pattern that we could not resist making it the Bug of the Month for August 2017.  According to BugGuide:  “‘Flag Moth’ is a common name coined for the subfamily Pericopinae by Hogue (1993).”  So, in a feeble attempt on the part of our editorial staff to explain the common name, this would be the northernmost ranging species in a genus in the Flag Moth subfamily Pericopinae recognized by Charles L. Hogue.

OMG! How exciting!!! I felt like there was something special about this moth. It’s funny, I seem to have interesting bug experiences when I travel here. Several years ago, I submitted a picture of a Hercules beetle with my son’s Hot Wheels car. We had found the poor fellow in a grocery store parking lot where local kids were poking it with a stick. I’ve been enjoying your site ever since. Thanks for the honor, I’m pleased I was able to submit something interesting!

Trina Woodall

Wow Trina,
That was ten years ago.  We did not have the Bug Humanitarian Award tag at that time, but we need to retroactively tag that Grant’s Hercules Beetle sighting with the award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination