From the monthly archives: "June 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Lesbos
June 28, 2017 1:15 pm
Daniel,
You were kind enough to identify some insects on Lesbos for me some time ago. I have now been back to Lesbos and have s few more for you. I hope to use these in a talk I have been asked to do for an RSPB group and would appreciate your help as I have been unable to identify them on line,
Regards
Signature: William Smiton

Small Copper

Dear William,
We began to research this Copper Butterfly with the Checklist of the Butterflies of Lesvos that is included on the Lesvos Birding site.  Two coppers are listed and the Small Copper link led us to this image on FlickR of
Lycaena phlaeas.  We learned on Learn About Butterflies that:  “The Small Copper is a very widespread species, occurring in Canada, the eastern United States, the Canary Isles, almost all of Europe including sub-arctic areas of Scandinavia, and across temperate Asia as far east as Japan. It also occurs across much of Africa, from the Atlas mountains and north African grasslands, south to Kenya and Malawi.”  According to BugGuide, the common name is American Copper, but that just won’t do for Lesbos.  BugGuide does note:  “The name American Copper is misleading, as there is nothing particularly American about this species. It is found across Eurasia and in mountains of northern and eastern Africa, and it bears many vernacular names depending upon the region found. It is the most widespread species of the genus Lycaena, and among the most widespread of all butterfly species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket
Location: Lesbos
June 28, 2017 1:15 pm
Daniel,
You were kind enough to identify some insects on Lesbos for me some time ago. I have now been back to Lesbos and have s few more for you. I hope to use these in a talk I have been asked to do for an RSPB group and would appreciate your help as I have been unable to identify them on line,
Regards
Signature: William Smiton

Bush Cricket

Dear William,
This is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and the common name Bush Cricket is frequently used in Europe.  The individual in your image is a male, and the wings are either not fully developed or they do not permit a mature individual to fly.  We are having a bit of difficulty identifying the species.  This individual on Getty Images looks similar, but it is only identified to the family, and it is a female as evidenced by her ovipositor.  There is an endemic species of Bush Cricket on Lesbos,
Poecilimon mytelensis, and it is pictured on Pbase, but it looks like a different species to us, but again, it is a female.  The male pictured on Minden Pictures does not have wings, so we suspect your individual is a different species, but we are having problems finding images of Bush Crickets on Lesbos other than Poecilimon mytelensis that are identified to the species level.  This FlickR image looks close, but again, no species name.  So, this is a Bush Cricket in the family Tettigoniidae, but we do not believe it is the endemic Poecilimon mytelensis.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: East Florida
June 28, 2017 11:53 am
Hello bugman.
I found these bugs under a leaf in my garden. Are they good bugs? Do they kill bad bugs?
Signature: Crystal

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Crystal,
These are Stink Bug hatchlings in the family Pentatomidae.  Most Stink Bugs feed on plants, but there are some predatory species, though these do not look like a predatory species.  They might be hatchlings of the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, but many Stink Bug hatchlings look similar.  Based on this BugGuide image, your individuals might be in the genus
Podisus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiny Orange-banded Caterpillar
Location: Amherst, MA
June 28, 2017 8:48 pm
Found several of these of an unmowed field in Amherst, MA.
Signature: Randall Phillis

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar

Dear Randall,
We were able to identify your Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar,
Euphydryas phaeton, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The primary larval food source is turtlehead (Chelone glabra), although recent studies have shown that the caterpillars will eat a larger variety of plant species including English plantain (Plantago lanceolata), a common yard weed.”  The adult Baltimore Checkerspot is a very lovely butterfly.

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar

Thank you so much.
This helps and clearly is the match.
Feel free to use the photos I sent if they could be helpful for you guys.
Randy Phillis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapiller Destroyed Palm and stings too
Location: Albion, Guyana, South America
June 28, 2017 11:19 am
This little guy and a few of his friends ate up my small palm tree. Didn’t see them under the leaf and hit them with my arm. Arm swelled up and burned.
I just wondering what it is?
Signature: Troy Kozza

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Troy,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but we are not certain of the species.  It looks very similar to this image from Master File, but it is only identified to the family level.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs Insetologia will recognize it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large beetle
Location: Hanover County, Virginia
June 28, 2017 10:47 am
I need some identification on this beetle. It was in my skimmer box. It’s very large-over 1″ long, 3/4″ wide, and sits up 1/2″ high. All these measurements are with its hairy legs tucked in. It looks like a rhinoceros beetle except for the stripes.
Signature: Judy Hill

Dung Beetle

Dear Judy,
We believe we have correctly identified your Dung Beetle as
Dichotomius carolinus thanks to the Blue Jay Barrens site where it states:  “The beetle at first appeared to be adorned with pale stripes.  Closer examination revealed the stripes to actually be soil caked into grooves on the wing covers.  Dung Beetle larvae develop in the ground at the bottom of a deep burrow where they feed on a supply of dung placed there by the adult beetle.  The beetles can accumulate soil on their bodies when digging nest burrows or when burrowing out of the soil after pupation.”  According to BugGuide:  “A big, black or blackish-brown, and bulky dung beetle. Note prominent striations on elytra, though these are often partly filled with dirt. Pronotum distinctively shaped. Vertex of head has short, blunt horn in male” and “Said to be so strong that it is hard to hold within a clenched fist.”  Your individual appears to possess the “short, blunt horn” indicating it is a male.

Dung Beetle

Oh my goodness!  Thank you so much!  I have searched all the beetle sites and couldn’t find it. It is huge
Thank you again. My 9 yr. old granddaughter saves all the different hugs she finds.
Judy
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination