From the monthly archives: "January 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Request
Location: East Africa
January 19, 2017 7:28 pm
Hi there,
Here are a few interesting ‘bugs’ I photographed while living in Tanzania between 2008 and 2011. Hoping you can help me (finally) identify exactly what they are 🙂
Many thanks
IMG 8969 in Longido, Northern Tanzania (found dead)
Tom

Prionid

Dear Tom,
This is one of the Longicorns from the family Cerambycidae, and it is one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae.  Based on this FlickR posting, it might be in the genus
Tithoes, however it does not resemble others from that genus on our site.  Based on The Old World Cerambycidae Search, it appears to be Anthracocentrus beringei, but searching that name does not provide any additional information.  While we cannot with certainty provide you with a species, we are nonetheless confident it is a member of the subfamily Prioninae.   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Taiwan
Location: Hsinchu County, Taiwan
January 22, 2017 6:29 am
Forgive me if this has already been asked. I live in the countryside of northern Taiwan and spend most mornings running through the hills and mountains as well as farm areas. I take photos as I go.
I have found a spider that seems to spin an x-shaped web. There are so many interesting insects I see in the mountains here that I can’t identify, but this has been the most interesting.
Thanks much for your time!
Signature: paulawanda

Orbweaver

Dear paulawanda,
This magnificent spider is an Orbweaver in the genus
Argiope.  Spiders in that genus are sometimes called Writing Spiders because of the elaborate designs, called stabilimenta, that are woven in their webs.  Many members of the genus are pictured on Wongchunxing.com where Argiope aetheroides looks like a good visual match to your individual.  Insectoid.info indicates “18 Species in Argiopinae for Taiwan listed.”

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Darien Illinois suburb of Chicago
January 22, 2017 7:27 am
Found on second floor of 2 story home
Signature: Tim Vavra

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Tim,
The invasive, introduced Brown Marmorated Stink Bug frequently enters homes to hibernate when the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Southeastern USA
January 22, 2017 12:15 pm
I have these bugs on my porch rail. The jump but don’t bite that I know of
Signature: Kat

Globular Springtail

Dear Kat,
This looks like a benign Globular Springtail to us.  Here is a much more detailed image from BugGuide.

Hi Daniel,
How can I get rid of them or are they that helpful to me?
Thanks,
Kat

They are considered beneficial in that they help to break down raw materials into nutritious soil, but if they are too numerous, they may be a nuisance.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I don’t think it’s a bed bug, but what is it?
Location: Seoul, South Korea
January 25, 2017 7:06 am
I keep finding these little guys around my apartment. Started showing up about two weeks ago once it really started getting cold, though I don’t know if that has anything to do with it. I find one – five of them a day, usually crawling on the wall or floor. I live in a one room apartment in South Korea, so kitchen pantry, bed, and bathroom are all within reach. I generally find the bugs near my computer desk or on the floor near the bed. As far as I can tell from googling around, they don’t look like bedbugs, but I’m starting to wonder if I should be concerned about them as I’m only finding more of them every day now.
Thanks for the help!
Signature: Owen

Grain Weevil

Dear Owen,
This is a Grain Weevil, a cosmopolitan household pest that infests stored grain products including rice, pet foods and bird seed.  Search the pantry and that bargain bag of pet food for possible sources of your infestation.

Amazing! Thank you so much for the quick ID. I’ll purge the pantry ASAP. This website is fantastic!
– Owen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little green beetle
Location: South Australia
January 24, 2017 10:51 pm
Hi Bugman,
My name is Brooke. Today I found the cutest little beetle and after hours of failed research I couldn’t find the name! Please, do you know what bug this is?!
Signature: Curiouser and curiouser

Clown Beetle

Dear Brooke,
Because of the general shape of the beetle, and especially the shape of the antennae, we are quite confident this is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, but alas, we did not find any matching images on the Brisbane Insect website.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had with a species identification for you.

Clown Beetle

Correction:  Clown Beetle, NOT Scarab Beetle
Thanks to two readers who provided comments with corrections, we now know that this is a Clown Beetle in the genus Saprinus.  According to the Australian Museum site:  “Histerids are usually shiny black or metallic-green beetles with introverted heads. Carrion-feeding forms generally hide under a corpse during the daylight, and only become active at night when they enter the maggot-infested part of the corpse to capture and devour maggots. Like other beetles inhabiting carrion, they have fast larval development with only two larval stages.  Beetles of the genus Saprinus are among the first beetles to arrive at carrion. The adults feed on both the larvae and pupae of all species of blowfly, although they have a preference for fresh pupae. The adults lay their eggs in the corpse, and the larvae feed on blowfly pupae when they emerge.”  The Atlas of Living Australia has supporting imagery and a nice range map.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination