From the monthly archives: "January 2017"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black ??
Location: San Diego CA, coastal
January 27, 2017 4:18 pm
Hi, What do I have crawling in my succulent outdoors? I splashed water and accidentally knocked back this huuge bee-like creature. Now it is moving as if blind, slowly reaching out to feel for something to move to (although maybe it also did that before I saw it). It is nearly 1.5 inches long, 6 black fuzzy legs, everything black except iridescent wings with magenta color. So big. Struggling–it is late January. My pics aren’t showing the full length.
Thanks!
Signature: Bug Watcher of My Yard

Female Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Bug Watcher,
This is a female Valley Carpenter Bee, a species that nests in dead branches, telephone poles and other places where a gallery can be burrowed into wood.  They sometimes nest in exposed house beams.  Valley Carpenter Bees exhibit extreme sexual dimorphism, and the males are golden and look like a different species, an observation that is really evident when they are mating.

THANK YOU so much for this information AND the work you do!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t figure out what this is
Location: Ohio
January 27, 2017 8:14 am
I woke up with two of these laying on me , I can’t figure out what they are.
Signature: Kaitlynn

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Kaitlynn,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  Considering your location and the time of year, we can think of two reasons why you encountered them.  The larvae of Longhorned Borer Beetles are found boring in wood, and they are often very species specific regarding food, sometimes feeding on a single species of tree.  If you have a wood burning stove or fireplace and you have a wood pile indoors, it might be a local species that emerged early due to the warmth indoors.  It is also possible that some species can survive in milled lumber.  It is not unknown for adult beetles to emerge from a piece of furniture (new bed perhaps?) or newly installed wood paneling.  On a positive note, they will not lay eggs in furniture or structural wood, so one they have emerged, they will NOT reproduce in your home.  Unfortunately, we cannot determine the species from your image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help
Location: Carrollton, TX 75010
January 27, 2017 9:06 am
I managed to take a picture of this bug that scared the living hell out of me a few years ago and I’ve been wanting to ID it ever since.
Signature: Joseph

Wheel Bug

Dear Joseph,
Predatory Wheel Bugs are not aggressive towards humans, but we would not want to eliminate the possibility that a bite might occur if a Wheel Bug is carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Zambia
January 26, 2017 11:52 pm
Hi. I am a farmer in Zambia, Central Africa, and have noticed a lot of these bugs on my sorghum crop. They are not damaging the crop but I am hoping that maybe they are predatory and maybe feeding on either the yellow cane aphids or fall army worm eggs/larvae. Any help would be appreciated. We are in our mid summer wet season.
Thanks
Signature: Adrian

Mating Soldier Beetles

Dear Adrian,
We believe these are Soldier Beetles in the family Cantharidae.  This posting on iSpot looks like a very good visual match, but it is only identified to the family level.  Of the family members, BugGuide states:  “Adults eat nectar, pollen, other insects; larvae are fluid-feeding predators, feed on insect eggs and larvae” so we are pleased to inform you that this is a beneficial species and you have no cause to worry about your crop. 

Soldier Beetle

Thanks for the quick response, these most certainly look like soldier beetles. Now you have narrowed it down for me I will do a bit more research into them and try and figure out exactly which one it is, will keep you posted.
Thanks
A.Bignell
Mazabuka
Zambia

Soldier Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Glowworm
Location: Forest near Newport, Oregon
January 26, 2017 11:47 pm
This bug has bothered me for years. As a kid, I discovered these tiny bugs in the topsoil of a forest a few miles out of Newport, Oregon, near a cabin where my family stays occasionally. The bug is remarkable in that the circumstances to discover it were extraordinary.
Me and my brother and some of our friends created a game we called ‘real-life Slenderman’ where we would go out in the woods at night and try to collect notebook pages, like in the video game ‘Slender’, all while being pursued by my brother wearing a mask. Good for some thrills, certainly. The game necessitates spending a good amount of time alone in the woods in pitch darkness. Because of this, we quickly discovered minuscule lights in the soil beneath our feet, impossible to see except in total darkness. We found tiny segmented bugs with two faintly glowing ‘eyespots’ on their backs, which we observed in detail upon collecting some and bringing them into the house. They are less than a quarter inch long, dark brown, and segmented. I don’t remember if it was the front two spots or the back two that glowed, but it was two spots on each one. They were quite mobile when brought into the house, and moved in centipede-like fashion across a plate.
Since then, I have gone to the same spot many times to try and find more ‘glowworms’, but have not been able to find any. I did a thorough internet search on any ‘glowworms’ native to the Pacific Northwest, but found nothing remotely resembling this find. Perhaps it is not known as a ‘glowworm’ since the glowing is extremely faint.
I would love to have this resolved, and if nothing else, the story of how it was discovered is worth appreciating.
Signature: -Rebecca

Firefly Larvae

Dear Rebecca,
We actually believe these are Firefly Larvae from the family Lampyridae and not Glowworms in the family Phengodidae, but we are really reluctant to provide a more specific identification. 
Pterotus obscuripennis is an Oregon species pictured on BugGuide, but it looks very different from your larvae.

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s This Coleopteran?
Location: Chalalán Ecolodge, Madidi National Park, Aten Canton, Apolo Municipality, Franz Tamayo Province, La Paz Department, Bolivia
January 25, 2017 4:03 pm
These are two different individuals that I believe to be from the same family, if not genus. If possible, I would love to know what family that is. One is purple and black, and the other is white and black, and their elytra come to an arch or point in the center of their body. These were found and taken at Chalalán Ecolodge, Madidi National Park, Aten Canton, Apolo Municipality, Franz Tamayo Province, La Paz Department, Bolivia. This is a NT0166 Southwest Amazon Moist Forest WWF Ecoregion.
Signature: Thank you so much WTB

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Your purple beetle is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae, and this individual from Columbia in our archives shares characteristics with your individuals, so we are in agreement that both beetles are in the same family.  This image on Getty Images is only identified to the family level.  We located this cyan-blue individual on Project Noah that is identified as Cypherotylus cf. dromedarius, with the species name being a reference to the camel-like hump.  Insetologia, our sister site in Brazil has this wonderful posting. 

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination