From the yearly archives: "2016"

Gentle Readers,
The editorial staff from What’s That Bug? will be away from the office for the holidays.  We will not be responding to any identification requests until 2017, but we have postdated submissions to go live to our site daily in our absence.  Enjoy the holidays.

Update:  January 2, 2017
We have returned and we are trying to catch up on all the emails that arrived while we were away.

, anSubject: Black caterpillar with orange spikes
Location: South Africa
December 20, 2016 6:59 am
I would like to find out what butterfly or moth might be the adult of this black caterpillar with orange spikes and white spots found feeding (in groups) on a Pigeonwood tree (Trema orientalis) in our garden in South Africa.
Signature: Craig Morris

Saturniidae Caterpillar

Saturniidae Caterpillar

Dear Craig,
Your caterpillar will eventually metamorphose into a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  We are posting your submission as unidentified prior to beginning any research.  This morning is our last day in the office before catching a plane in a few hours for a holiday trip and we may not be able to provide a species name for you because of the time needed to research your caterpillar’s identity.  In our own archives we have an image of Predatory Hemipterans feeding on the caterpillar of
Imbrasia wahlbergi and it looks like the same species as your caterpillar.  Images posted to iSpot Nature confirm that identification.  We also have images in our archive of Gonimbrasia (Nudaurelia) wahlbergii and we believe they represent the same species. 

Dear Daniel
Thank you for your very speedy reply. That looks spot on – very similar to the Wahlberg’s Emperor Moth (Nudaurelia wahlbergi) found here.
I appreciate your help.
Have a good holiday.
Regards
Craig

Subject: White spider
Location: Southern Minnesota
December 19, 2016 1:57 pm
Found tons of these in my friend’s basement and barn. I think it is a cellar spider but when I touched it it took off crawling. They were everywhere. What could cause the white coloration? And every one I tried to touch crawled away
Signature: T. Arends

Cellar Spider with Fungus Infection

Cellar Spider with Fungus Infection

Dear T. Arends,
This is a Cellar Spider and it has a lethal fungus infection.  If it was indeed alive and it crawled away, it is not long for this world.

Subject: tiny blue and black bug
Location: Burlington, KY 41005
November 23, 2016 11:32 am
Hello,
This little guy landed on me outside earlier today. I’m in northern Kentucky, Burlington to be exact. It’s a chilly day out, temps are in the low 50’s and it was drizzling earlier. I can’t seem to find a bug similar to this on the Web, and am curious to know what it is.
Thank you!
Signature: Samantha

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Samantha,
As you can see by comparing your image to this BugGuide image, your insect is a Woolly Aphid in the family Eriosomatinae, but since many Woolly Aphids look quite similar, we cannot provide you with a genus nor species.

Subject: What is this!?
Location: Buderim QLD 4556
November 30, 2016 6:00 pm
Hey there,
Found this little guy in my garage. Would say it would nearly be the size of my hand. Was HUGE!
His back looked like wood and he had six legs.
I live on the Sunshine Coast and it’s the first day of Summer here.
Thank you
Signature: Lilly

Prionid

Prionid

Dear Lilly,
This Root Borer in the subfamily Prioninae looks like
Agrianome spinicollis, and your submission is the third this year of this species.

Subject: caterpillar
Location: sao paulo, brazil
November 29, 2016 5:21 pm
I have found many of this caterpillar all over a bindweed I have at my house’s garden. They are eating the leaves and I have got a burn when I stepped over one of them. I would like to know if it will become a butterfly – and therefore I should let them in peace – or if it is dangerous and I should kill them (in this case, what type of poison I should use).
Signature: Ana Elisa Salles

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ana Elisa,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the subfamily Lymantriinae, and many Tussock Moth Caterpillars have stinging hairs, as you learned.  The adult is a moth, not a butterfly, and we do not provide extermination advice.  Your caterpillar resembles North American Tussock Moths in the genus
Orgyia, but we have not found any images online from Brazil of black Tussock Moth Caterpillars with white tufts.