From the yearly archives: "2016"

Subject: mystery bug
Location: unknown
February 15, 2016 5:26 pm
I work at a grocery store. This bug was found on a door near where we were unpacking plants for the floral department today. We get flowers from Florida, Mexico, Costa Rica, locally (Alabama), and some boxes aren’t labeled. We aren’t sure where he came from or what box he got out of. Sorry we couldnt be more help.
Signature: Rachel from Winn-Dixie

Green Weevil

Golden Headed Weevil, perhaps

Dear Rachel,
This is some species of Weevil in the superfamily Curculionoidea and we believe it is a Broad Nosed Weevil in the subfamily Entiminae which is well represented on BugGuide, a site that is devoted to North American sightings.  We do not believe this is a native species, but we are not certain.  We will contact Eric Eaton for a second opinion, but since flowers may come from many parts of the world, including Columbia and Australia, it may be difficult to get a conclusive ID.  We are going to tag this posting as an Invasive Exotic until we learn otherwise.

Eric Eaton Concurs
Daniel:
I would agree that this is probably a foreign species, maybe in the genus Compsus, but I can’t be positive.  As a result, I don’t have any links to provide, either.
Eric

Subject: reddish-brown stag beetle?
Location: Denver, Colorado
February 15, 2016 12:23 am
Hello Bugman,
I found this guy, or gal, on my kitchen floor last August. I was sure that it was a reddish-brown stag beetle, but it appears to be in possession of the wrong antennae. Any help identifying our house guest would be appreciated. Incidentally, I have lived in Colorado since 1989 and have never seen another of these that whole time.
Signature: Cheers, Rusty

Pedunculate Ground Beetle

Pole Borer

Dear Rusty,
You are quite observant to notice that though it resembles a Stag Beetle, this Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae has decidedly different antennae.  We believe this is a Pedunculate Ground Beetle in the genus
Pasimachus based on images posted to BugGuide.  Several members of the depressus group are found in Colorado, according to BugGuide.  Our main reservation is the reddish color of your individual it appears individuals on BugGuide are black.  We will check with Eric Eaton and get his opinion.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
This is a longhorned beetle, believe it or not.  It is a male “Pole Borer,” Neandra brunnea.  I have yet to find one here myself, but I know there are records for the species here in Colorado.
Eric

According to BugGuide, the Pole Borer:  “A robust yellowish-brown to reddish-brown longhorn, resembles a stag beetle, perhaps, but antennae are not clubbed. Specific characters:
tarsi with five visible segments, no process between tarsal claws
eyes emarginate
pronotum subquadrate (almost square), widest at front
elytra without striations.”

Thank you so much for the reply. Thanks, also, for pointing me in a new direction. I was going nuts looking at countless pictures of stag beetles in hopes of finding one with the same antennas.
Cheers Rusty

Subject: What’s this bug??
Location: Tulum Mexico
February 14, 2016 9:21 pm
Please tell me what this funky bug is in my hotel room in tulum Mexico
Signature: Lisa k

Texas Wasp Moth

Texas Wasp Moth

Dear Lisa,
Though it looks like a wasp, the creature that visited you in your hotel room is a Texas Wasp Moth,
Horama panthalon, a harmless creature that mimics a stinging wasp in both its appearance and its diurnal habits.  Thanks to your submission, we were also able to identify this previously unidentified Texas Wasp Moth that has been in our archives since 2007.

Subject: Spruces with tiny scale on stem.
Location: Pennsylvania 19446
February 7, 2016 11:04 am
There is an area of several miles with Colarado Spruce and White Pine decline. The White Pines have Eriophyid Mites and Pine Oystershell scale. The Spruces also have Eriophyid Mites and a scale that looks smaller and different than spruce bud scale. Any ideas?
Signature: Chris

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Dear Chris,
We have tried several times to find information on Scale Insects that attack spruce, but to no avail.  We could really use a Hemipteran expert to assist with this ID.

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Subject: mole cricket australia
Location: lower north shore, sydney, nsw, australia
February 14, 2016 1:11 pm
Hi, we found a mole cricket in our living room the other day (sorry to say we killed it, but at the time didn’t know it’s harmless). Since identified this insect thru your site. Great site! I’m amazed at the geographical worldwide spread of these crickets! Thought you might like to know they also occur in urban Sydney, Australia! Feel free to add this comment/photo to your collection !
Signature: josy

Mole Cricket Carnage

Mole Cricket Carnage

Dear Josy,
We are happy you were able to identify your Mole Cricket using our site.  We are also glad to learn that now that you have learned they are harmless, future encounters will have a happier ending.  Mole Crickets really do have a global distribution, and we have many submissions from Australia.

Subject:  California Slender Salamanders
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2016
We decided to do some late afternoon gardening, and we occasionally overturn a log in the garden just to see what we can find.  We keep rotting logs in the yard for habitat, and we have also constructed our garden walls from broken concrete.  Decisions like that are important for providing habitat for native species.  Well, under the first log was a cute little California Slender Salamander in the genus
Batrachoseps, most likely the Garden Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps major major, which is found in Southern California.  According to California Herps Identifying Salamanders page:  “This is the small worm-like salamander commonly found in gardens and yards in coastal southern California. It is often seen under surface objects, especially in moist and shaded areas, but it may also be found under cover in open areas including coastal chaparral. This is a small, thin salamander, which might look like a worm on first sight, before the tiny limbs are noticed. Often they will be found coiled up under a surface object. When disturbed, they may spring up and writhe on the ground, wagging their tail, which sometimes is let loose as a distraction. It is also easily detached when a salamander is handled. Many of these salamanders will be found with an incompletely re-grown tail.  This is one of two small, slender salamander occuring in Southern California in the areas shown on the map below, but the second species is less commonly encountered and is found in the mountains. There are many other species of slender salamanders occuring throughout the state which all look so much alike that they are nearly impossible to identify without using a range map.” Upon overturning a neighboring log, we found two more Garden Slender Salamanders. All were about three inches long. We carefully replaced the logs after taking a few images.

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamanders

Garden Slender Salamanders