From the yearly archives: "2016"

Subject: Beetle from Papua New Guinea
Location: New Ireland Province, Papua New Guinea
June 1, 2016 8:25 am
Hi guys! Is this some manner of stag beetle? Found on a recent trip to New Ireland Province, Papua New Guinea. There were a bunch of beetle carcasses littering the path.
Signature: Anon

Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Dear Anon,
This is NOT a Stag Beetle, but rather a Scarab Beetle, commonly called a Horned Rhinoceros Beetle,
Xylotrupes gideon lamarchus, a species we identified on Butterfly Designs.  According to Farangs Gone Wild:  “Attracted to Blacklight.”  According to Insects on Palms it is a species that attacks the blooms on coconut palms.  The condition in which you found it and others indicates that some predator fed on the fatty, nutritious body, leaving behind the less edible parts of the Horned Rhinoceros Beetle, including the legs, wings and horns.  We sometimes receive images of related Rhinoceros Beetles in North America that have been eaten, leaving behind only the head.

Subject: Pink slug looking
Location: Southeast Florida
May 31, 2016 5:22 pm
What is this
Signature: Scared

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Dear Scared,
These are the Eggs of an Apple Snail which we identified on Nature Time.  According to the Apple Snail Website:  “It is remarkable how visible the egg clutches of many apple snail species are. The pinkish to reddish eggs are attached on the contrasting green vegetation submerging from the water (in the genus Pomacea). This makes them visually inconspicuous from many meters away for predators. This suggests a possible warning function for unpalatability. Field evidence of this unpalatability is provided by the fact that almost all animals foraging in habitats where the apple snails live, ignore these eggs: from fish to birds, they all leave them alone. Also when apple snail eggs are offered to captive predators, they often try to eat them at first, but refuse them after repeated feeding.”  According to My Florida Backyard:  “Apple snails (family Ampullariidae) are freshwater snails that are able to survive both on water and on land. By laying their eggs above the water line, apple snails protect the eggs from predation by fish and other water dwellers.”  

Subject: Large black beetle
Location: Southern California- beach area
June 2, 2016 1:59 pm
Hi- could you identify this bug for me? It was found in Southern California climbing through some wood chips at the local school. It didn’t move very fast but was really large! The second photo is when he flipped upside down. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Lacy

California Root Borer

California Root Borer

Dear Lacy,
This is a female California Root Borer, Prionus californicus, and you can compare your individual to this image of a pair of California Root Borers on BugGuide as well as this image of the ventral surface of another individual pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”

California Root Borer

California Root Borer

Subject: Wasp, Bug, or Something Else?
Location: Anacortes, WA
June 2, 2016 7:55 pm
This pretty thing was on a stump next to my kitchen garden this morning. It was about an inch long. Can anyone identify it, please?
Signature: Lorien Shaw

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Lorien,
This is one of the predatory Bee-Like Robber Flies in the genus
Laphria, and we believe it resembles Laphria columbica which is pictured on BugGuide, but we would not rule out another species like Laphria astur which is also pictured on BugGuide, or possibly another member of the genus.  Members of the genus found in the western portions of North America are pictured on swb.usachoice.net

After quite a bit of internet research, I had strong suspicion it was likely one of the predator critters, and I’m delighted to have a more specific direction for my queries.  Thanks so much for the assistance!
Els

Subject: Upstate NY alien bug
Location: Jeffersonville, NY
June 3, 2016 5:23 am
Hello. While visiting Jeffersonville, NY a friend and I found a ton of these bugs mating on a dock of a small Lake. We cannot seem to find this listed anywhere. Thoughts?
Signature: Jay Pellegrino

Dragonfly Exuviae

Dragonfly Exuviae

Dear Jay,
These are not mating insects.  These are the Exuviae or cast off exoskeletons of Dragonfly Naiads.  Immature Dragonflies, called Naiads, are aquatic, and as they near maturity, they crawl out of the water, generally seeking a vertical feature like a log jutting out of the water or reeds growing out of the water, or in your case, the dock, and there they molt for the final time, emerging as winged adult Dragonflies.  We suspect that a second Naiad used the Exuvia of another Naiad that exited the water earlier, and attached to it for support.

Wow thank you for replying!! We learned something today ?☺️