From the yearly archives: "2016"

Subject: Mystery bug in Maine
Location: Minot, ME
June 4, 2016 3:18 pm
Hello!
Our five year old son was recently catching frogs in the pond at our house and was “bit” by this strange bug. We then noticed that the pond was full of them. They have six legs, are aggressive, swim, also walk on land, two pinchers on the head as well as two small pinchers on the tail.
Signature: Colbath Family

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

Dear Colbath Family,
This is a Water Tiger, a common name for the larva of the Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae, and it is most likely in the genus
Dytiscus, based on this BugGuide image.

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

Subject: Pink Bug
Location: Presteigne, Powys
June 4, 2016 9:58 am
I live in the border country of Herefordshire/Shropshire/Wales. Near Presteigne, Powys. Rather high on a hill. This bug appeared on a stand of mint in a bed near the front of my house, south facing. This photo was taken today (4th June 2016). The weather was warm and overcast, no wind. The bug has a pink back with a metallic gold marking. An alternating pattern of black and white on either side, like a decorative trim.
Signature: Christine

Hairy Shieldbug

Hairy Shieldbug

Dear Christine,
Thanks to the British Bugs site, we were able to identify your Hairy Shieldbug, Dolycoris baccarum.  According to the site:  “A large and distinctive purple-brown and greenish shieldbug which is covered with long hairs. The antennae and connexivum are banded black and white. During the winter, the ground colour becomes uniformly dull brown.”  It is also called a Sloe Bug according to NatureSpot where it states:  “This bug overwinters as an adult, emerging in the spring. Larvae, which are also hairy, may be found on numerous plants besides Blackthorn, particularly those in the Roasaceae family. The new generation is complete from August onwards.”  According to Garden Safari:  “Of all the stink bugs this one is the worst. It really loves berries, especially Honeysuckle and Raspberries. It walks all over them, leaving behind an awful stinking substance. This makes all berries it walked over inedible. Like in other Stink Bugs the substance is made for protection. A bird or other enemy will eat only one bug in its entire live. Afterwards it will always remember the dreadful taste and will never touch another bug again.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your speedy reply. In spite of its beguiling pink and gold colours, it seems my bug is quite a nasty creature!
I am most grateful to you for taking the time to answer my question. Best wishes to you for your interesting website!
Christine
Herefordshire

Subject: BUG ID
Location: Portland, oregon
June 4, 2016 1:47 pm
Hi my name is Dez, I’m almost six. We are helping with research about pollinators and are trying to find out more about them so we can keep helping them. I’m also making a blog post about them.
We saw this bug here in Portland, Oregon and can’t identify it from anything we found online. Could you help?
Thanks very much,
Signature: Dez

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Dear Dez,
We are pleased to hear about your concern with pollinators, and it is wonderful that you will be blogging about what you learn.  This is a Small Milkweed Bug,
Lygaeus kalmii, a species that is generally found not far from its host plant, Milkweed.  According to BugGuide citing another article:  “Adults suck nectar from flowers of various herbaceous plants, and also feed on milkweed seeds(?). Also reported to be scavengers and predators, especially in spring when milkweed seeds are scarce. They have been reported feeding on honey bees, monarch caterpillars and pupae, and dogbane beetles, among others.”

Thank you so much for telling us what this bug is called and some of its features! I was so excited to get such a fast response!
Dez

Subject: Crane Fly?
Location: Indiana, USA
June 4, 2016 11:24 am
This appears to be a some form of Crane Fly on side of house, June 2016, but cannot ID.
Signature: Kurt

Possibly Tiger Crane Fly

Possibly Tiger Crane Fly

Dear Kurt,
This is one of the Large Crane Flies in the family Tipulidae, and we believe it resembles this Tiger Crane Fly,
Nephrotoma eucera , that is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject: Weird bug!!
Location: NS, Canada
June 4, 2016 10:55 am
It flies in the weirdest way – hovers? Nothing like I’ve seen before!
Signature: Chelsea

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

Dear Chelsea,
The black and white markings of the Phantom Crane Fly allow it to appear and disappear as it languidly flies in sun dappled shade, hence the common name Phantom Crane Fly.  This is the second image we posted of this species today, and the previous posting was the first report we have received of the species this year.

Subject: Asian Longhorned Beetle or Spotted White Pine Sawyer?
Location: Saxtons River, Vermont
June 4, 2016 11:33 am
Found her on my house in southeastern VT. If she’s an Asian Longhored beetle, that’s bad news, since they’re a destructive invasive. I’m thinking it is a female Spotted White Pine Sawyer, but it is best to ask the experts (I also reported her to the state dept. of agriculture, just to be safe)
Signature: Patrick

Whitespotted Sawyer

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Patrick,
This is not the Asian Longhorned Beetle or Starry Night Beetle,
Anoplophora glabripennis, an invasive species.  We agree with you, because of the white scutellum, that this is a Whitespotted Sawyer, and you may compare your image to this BugGuide image for verification.