From the yearly archives: "2016"

Subject: 4 legged aquatic “Walking Stick”bug?
Location: Concord, MA
August 21, 2016 7:29 pm
While kayaking along the Concord River (Concord, MA) on August 21, 2016 I encountered this 4 legged insect atop a clump of decaying, floating weeds. At first the thought of a “Walking Stick” came to mind. But upon closer examination noticed the 4 legs (4 legs?). It was also about 4 inches long (body). Definitely not a Walking Stick! So what is this bug? I apologize for the picture qualities as I was moving (wind/current) and trying to capture this insect with a telephoto lens in a macro attempt.
Signature: dpsrams

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear dpsrams,
This unusual aquatic insect is a Water Scorpion in the genus
Ranatra.  Though only four of the legs are used for walking, the front pair of legs are raptorial, and they are used to capture and hold small aquatic creatures while the Water Scorpion sucks the life sustaining fluids from the body of the prey.  Water Scorpions are also capable of flying from pond to pond which comes in handy if conditions cause one pond to dry out.

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Subject: Robber Fly?
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
August 21, 2016 7:40 pm
I had an interesting visitor in the drive through at McDonald’s today. A large flying insect flew in my car window. I have never seen anything quite like it, so I started taking pictures of it with my cell phone. It landed on my cell phone case and stayed there, so I popped my cell phone out of the case and took several one-handed closeups. It seemed quite content to model for me and flew away when I was done.
Signature: Gary Manis

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Gary,
Your Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes.

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Subject: Large beetle-
Location: Lake Winnipesaukee– Moultonborough NH
August 21, 2016 5:12 pm
Found this guy on our deck today (August 21) on lake winnipesaukee in NH. Wondering what he is. He’s pictured here on my 11 year old’s hand. Set him on a branch of a bush and set him free. Any idea?
Signature: Linda

Odor of Leather Beetle

Odor of Leather Beetle

Dear Linda,
We love the common name Odor Of Leather Beetle, for
Osmoderma eremicola, due to, according to BugGuide:  “[a] strong odor of ‘Russian Leather’.”  It is also called a Hermit Flower Beetle.

Odor of Leather Beetle

Odor of Leather Beetle

Subject: Stick looking bug in a stream
Location: Bridgeport, CA
August 21, 2016 10:48 am
I found this bug crawling in the water in a stream near Bridgeport, CA.
Signature: Leonard Powell

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear Leonard,
This is a Caddisfly Larva, commonly called a Caseworm.  Each species of Caseworm constructs a case for protection that looks distinctly different from the cases of other species of Caddisfly.  The cases may be constructed of sticks, shells, sand, or other debris.

Subject: What Type of Caterpillar Is This??
Location: Columbus, Ohio
August 20, 2016 6:57 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I’ve seen tons of caterpillars around my house recently but I’ve never seen any like this one. What type of caterpillar is this??
Signature: Samantha

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Samantha,
Do you have milkweed plants growing near your house?  We believe this is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and it feeds on milkweed.  Though it seems lighter in color to individuals on our site, it does match this BugGuide image pretty closely.

That looks exactly like it, thank you!!

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Subject:  Sand Wasps attracted to Mint
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 20, 2016
The mint is continuing to attract Honey Bees as well as Skippers, Marine Blues, Syrphid Flies and some gorgeous wasps, like this Sand Wasp in the genus
Bembix.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Usually sandy areas; nest holes are dug in the sand; best opportunity to observe individuals is on dunes or where vegetation is sparse.”  BugGuide continues:  “Females provision their nest with flies which the larvae feed on (a single developing larva may eat more than twenty flies)” and “Provisioning is progressive. The females provide a greater number of prey over subsequent days during larval growth. Adults are excellent diggers and can disappear below the surface of loose sand within seconds.”

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp