From the monthly archives: "November 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Bug
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
November 26, 2016 5:20 pm
Dear Bugman
It´s the first time in 9 year I saw in my yard a large bug like this (about 2.5 cm long)
Can you help me identify it.
Signature: bicvenaa

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Dear bicvenaa,
This is a Big Legged Bug in the genus
Acanthocephala.  We cannot provide you with an exact species, but here is a similar looking individual, also from Venezuela, that is posted to Minden Pictures stock photo agency.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your response.
According to the picture from Minden Pictures no doubts about genus Acanthocephala.
Regards,

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification needed
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
November 22, 2016 12:29 pm
My daughter-in-law was taking out her xmas stuff and this bug was among her decorations.
Signature: Thank you. Tammy

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear Tammy,
This is a predatory Masked Hunter, a species with a sticky exoskeleton that accumulates dust and debris, effectively camouflaging or masking the Masked Hunter in its environment.  Though they are beneficial, also being credited with preying upon Bed Bugs, Masked Hunters are capable of biting humans, so they should be handled with caution to avoid a potentially painful, but not dangerous bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug! Queensland Australia
Location: Queensland Australia
November 26, 2016 4:08 pm
Hi,
Could you help us figure out what this bug is? It looks like an assasin bug but still has pink legs where as on google other assasin bugs have full black legs? Is it just a baby?
Thanks!
Signature: No preference

Fruit Spotting Bug nymph

Immature Fruit Spotting Bug

This is NOT an Assassin Bug.  Our gut reaction was that this must be a Leaf Footed Bug or Tip Wilter in the family Coreidae, and that suspicion proved correct when we located this FlickR image taken of Airlie Beach.  We found it identified as a Fruit Spotting Bug, Amblypelta lutescens or A. nitida , thanks to the Brisbane Insect site.  It is called a Banana Spotting Bug on the International Journal of Pest Management site.

Ahh thank you so much! It’s been driving is crazy 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae
Location: NE Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia
November 20, 2016 11:17 am
Dear Bugman,
Can you help me identify these larvae? I found them under a decaying mushroom. The mushroom looked similar to a reishi mushroom. I found them on September 21, ’16,not far from my vegetable garden. The mushrooms were growing around the roots of a decaying maple tree trunk. There were other mushrooms just like this. Good bug, or not so for my garden? I left them for the birds to eat, also they were really cool looking.
Thanks for any help with this.
Signature: Best, Marie Cooney

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Dear Marie,
Because you found them in association with a “decaying mushroom,” we took the chance that these might be Pleasing Fungus Beetle larvae, and our hunch proved correct based on this BugGuide image of
Megalodacne fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  In our opinion, this is a benign or beneficial species in the garden.

YAY! Thank you so much for identifying, it was driving me crazy!
Best,
Marie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this??
Location: Fillmore, California
November 25, 2016 4:55 pm
Can you tell me what kind of bug this is I found crawling in my backyard?
Signature: Kristianne

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Kristianne,
This is a Velvet Ant, a flightless female wasp in the genus
Dasymutilla.  Velvet Ants should be handled with extreme caution as they are reported to have a very painful sting.  Based on images posted to BugGuide, we believe your Velvet Ant might be Dasymutilla sackenii.

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow butterfly
Location: Ontario
November 26, 2016 9:16 am
Hi,
We found both of these (same butterfly) in the house, it’s white yellow with a few spots. Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks
Signature: Marie-Eve

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage Whites

Dear Marie-Eve,
These pretty little butterflies are Cabbage Whites, a European species thought to have been introduced into North America in the 19th Century.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced accidentally near Montreal in the 1860s, this species has become an important pest. Bacterial and viral diseases now provide some biological control.”  Caterpillars feed on cabbage and many other plants in the same family.

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage White

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination