From the monthly archives: "November 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: crazy grasshopper in costa rica
Location: Costa Rica
October 30, 2016 7:20 pm
Hi,
Sorry for all the submissions tonight. My husband and I live in Costa Rica and are aspiring nature photographers who see a lot of weird bugs and insects, but I will try not to overwhelm you with my hundreds of cool shots 🙂 Our neighbor took this photo of a strange ghost jellyfish looking grasshopper, any idea what kind it is? Thanks
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Katydid

Lichen Katydid

Dear Kari,
This is not a Grasshopper.  It is a Katydid.  We located a matching image on SongStar, but alas, it is not identified.  It is identified as
Markia hystrix on Nature Images and it is called by the common name Lichen Katydid on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth in Jakarta
Location: Jakarta
October 30, 2016 5:41 pm
Hi. This guy/gal was hanging on our patio wall in Jakarta, Indonesia, in late October. Any idea what it’s called?
Love your site. Thanks!
Signature: BT

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear BT,
While we did not find an exact visual match online, we did find several similar looking moths which makes us feel pretty confident this is a Fruit Piercing Moth in the subfamily Calpinae, similar to these images on this Bengkulu Blog or this image from the Papua Insect site.  It seems to most closely resemble
Eudocima (Adris) prolai from the Papua Insect site.

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black ant or wasp?
Location: MOunt Washinton/Los Angeles, Calif.
October 30, 2016 9:29 pm
Found this in my house on Mount Washington today. Don’t recall ever seeing one like this in the area in 50+ years living up here, but I do recall seeing them in more arid desert and forest areas of the Southwest. I just had guests from Henderson Nevada this weekend and suspect that it is a traveler from their belongings. I have it saved in a jar and is close to expiring when I came across it.
Thank you.
Signature: Rene Zambrano

Devil's Coachhorse

Devil’s Coachhorse

Dear Rene,
Though it does not look very beetle-like, this Devil’s Coachhorse is actually a Rove Beetle.  The Devil’s Coachhorse is a European species not native to North America, but it was probably introduced as far back as the 1930s and it is very well established.  We have frequent sightings of Devil’s Coachhorses in our own Mount Washington garden where they are eagerly welcomed as they are one of the few predators that will eat non-native snails and slugs.  When threatened, the Devil’s Coachhorse rears up its abdomen like a scorpion and releases a foul smell, but it is a harmless species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two insects
Location: Ravenel, SC
October 31, 2016 9:51 am
My husband found these guys in there work shop and was curious what they are.
Signature: Melissa

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Dear Melissa,
These are mating Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha and they should be handled with caution because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  Mating pairs are sometimes called Muskmares, though theoretically, only the female is a Muskmare.  You might enjoy this image of a herd of mating Muskmares from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination