From the monthly archives: "October 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper/bee hybrid?
Location: Bozeman, MT
September 30, 2016 3:17 pm
This was a very loud bug about 2.5 inches long in overall length. Looks like it had a stinger about 3/8 inches long.
Signature: Curious

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Curious,
This is a Pigeon Horntail, a non-stinging relative of wasps and bees.   See this BugGuide image for comparison.   Pigeon Horntails lay eggs beneath the bark on deciduous trees and the larvae are wood borers.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include beech, elm, hickory, maple, oak, poplar, apple, pear, sycamore, and hackberry.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth or Not Moth?
Location: Holly Springs, MS.
October 1, 2016 4:45 am
Hi!
As I was a “bug queen” for a day a few years ago on WTB, I thought I would ask about something I’ve never seen before.
The enclosed pics are of the siding in my house. There appears to be a “nest” to the left of a white moth. However, I did NOT see any wings on this “moth.” The nest had soft dried grass to the left, but the white part to the right was hard like plastic.
Would appreciate some bug love with an answer as to what my new critter friend is.
Thanks for all the wonderful info you give to your fans!
Signature: Stephanie Berry

Whitemarked Tussock Moth with Eggs

Whitemarked Tussock Moth with Eggs

Dear Stephanie,
There are several groups of moths in which the female is flightless, and we believe your moth is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth,
Orgyia leucostigma, or a closely related member of the genus.  Tussock Moths are also known as Vaporer Moths.  Here is an image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Flightless females lay a froth-covered mass of up to 300 eggs after mating.”

Whitemarked Tussock Moth with Eggs

Whitemarked Tussock Moth with Eggs

Thank you so much for the info!!  I never knew there were flightless  moths!
You do an amazing job for your readers!!!
Much love,
Steph aka Ellie Mae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Caterpillar with Black Spikes
Location: Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chinle, North Eastern AZ
September 30, 2016 11:09 am
Hello, I’m trying to identify this caterpillar (see photo) that we encountered at Canyon de Chelly. I have found some pictures of similar ones but nothing that looks exactly the same. Can you help?
Signature: Jeannette

Spiny Oakworm: Oslar's Oakworm

Spiny Oakworm: Oslar’s Oakworm

Dear Jeannette,
This is one of the Spiny Oakworms in the genus
Anisota, and because of your Arizona location, we are relatively certain it is Oslar’s Oakworm, Anisota oslari, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva – last instars are brick red” and “Larvae are known to feed on oaks, including Mexican blue oak (Quercus oblongifolia), scrub oak (Q. turbinella), and Emory oak (Q. emoryi).”  There are several related species in the genus found in eastern North America as well, and we frequently get images of mating Oakworm Moths  and newly emerged Oakworm Moths submitted to our site.  Since it is the first of the month, we are tagging your submission as our Bug of the Month for October 2016.

Thanks so much – it’s a beautiful caterpillar and I was frustrated trying to find out what it was. Your site is great!
Jeannette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination