From the monthly archives: "October 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth
Location: La Quinta, Ca (desert)
October 30, 2016 10:17 pm
This moth was in our home last night. This morning it was on the floor by the back door.
I picked it up and put it on the outside wall. He stayed there for a while, even allowing me to touch it.
Finally it flew away.
What is it?
Signature: Laurie

Rustic Sphinx

Rustic Sphinx

Dear Laurie,
This pretty Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth is a Rustic Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird new bug in North Texas
Location: N. Texas, DFW area
October 30, 2016 8:38 am
We found a new bug in our house and cannot identify it. The bug is green with long legs, red eyes and red bands around each leg near the “knee” and the “foot”. It has little wings (maybe it is a juvenile?) This is the best picture, missing a couple of legs and the body is a little beat up after my wife was either bit, stung, or pierced by this thing, and flung it to the ground. Thank you!
Signature: Devin

Smashed Assassin Bug

Smashed Assassin Bug

Dear Devin,
We have a difficult time tagging a submission as Unnecessary Carnage when that carnage occurred after the critter has inflicted a bite or sting on someone, but we still feel you should know that this was a beneficial, predatory Assassin Bug, and though they are considered beneficial, Assassin Bugs are capable of inflicting a painful bite if they are carelessly handled or accidentally encountered.  This immature Assassin Bug is a member of the genus
Zelus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug eggs
Location: Side of house Michigan
October 29, 2016 11:59 am
I found some bugs egg so what’s that bug
Signature: Dave

Bird's Nest Fungus

Bird’s Nest Fungus

Dear Dave,
These are NOT eggs.  You have a healthy colony of Bird’s Nest Fungus,
Cyathus olla, and you can read more about Bird’s Nest Fungus on Wayne’s Word where it states it is “a tiny cup-shaped fungus containing minute flattened spheres resembling eggs in a bird’s nest.”  According to Gardening Know How:  “The fungus doesn’t harm any living plants or organisms and assist in the important cycle of soil renewal. For this reason, getting rid of bird’s nest fungus is not necessary for the health of your garden. However, if the sticky fruiting bodies adhere to siding or other items, they can be difficult to remove. In this case, bird’s nest fungus control should consist of repelling tactics.”

Bird's Nest Fungus

Bird’s Nest Fungus

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wheel Bug
Location: South central Virginia
October 29, 2016 7:38 am
I got a great close-up of a Wheel Bug and wanted to share it. I’m in south central Virginia.
Signature: Nina Eagle

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Nina,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful image of a Wheel Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big red ant?
Location: Central Florida
October 29, 2016 9:52 am
Found this ant crawling around on my patio in central Florida, late October but still plenty warm. Never seen such a big ant here before and would like to know if they are an issue.
Signature: William

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear William,
This Velvet Ant, which is actually a flightless female wasp that can deliver a very painful sting if carelessly handled, appears to be
Dasymutilla archboldi which is pictured on BugGuide and found in Florida.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth?
Location: Vancouver BC Canada
October 29, 2016 9:56 am
They seem to be stationary over 2 days, they seem not to have even moved
I am an arborist and found them on a young ash tree, could they be feeding on the sap?
They are about 2 inches or 5 cm long and the photo taken in late October 2016
Signature: Richard Lange

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Richard,
This is the Chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly in the genus
Papilio.  Since you are an arborist and you were able to identify the tree, we suspect this is the Chrysalis of a Pale Swallowtail, a species with a caterpillar that feeds on the leaves of Ash and other trees, and that ranges in your area.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on foliage of woody plants in several families: Rosaceae (cherry, e.g., Prunus emarginata, Holly-leaved Cherry, Prunus ilicifolia), Rhamnaceae (California Coffee-berry, Rhamnus californica, Ceanothus spp.), Oleaceae (ash, Fraxinus) and Betulaceae. Overwinters as pupa, adults emerge in spring. Males seek hilltops for mating.”  Based on the BugGuide information, you will have to wait for spring to see the adult Pale Swallowtail emerge.

Thank you so much for your fast reply
Kind Regards
Richard Lange – Tree MD®

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination