From the monthly archives: "September 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iris Borer Moth
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 24, 2016 4:09 pm
Greetings, Daniel!
I mentioned an Iris Borer Moth I saw years ago. Back in 2013 I still had Flag Iris growing in my Rain Garden. As I weeded, I found rotting rhizomes, large larva and numerous pupae, all of which got tossed into the yard for later raking up and taking to compost. The robins were quite happy with the feasts they found in the “weeds” I was pulling up! I even got a couple photos of robins with the grubs in their beaks!
Well, that summer I decided no more iris for me in my garden. Just before that decision, I was working in a section when I saw this large moth. It was resting at the base of an iris plant so I had my suspicions as to what it was. An absolutely gorgeous moth as I previously mentioned, with patterns reminiscent of Native American Cave Paintings or even petroglyphs. Being me, I took several photos from a couple angles to use for possible identification (this was before I discovered your awesome website!). And of course my suspicions were confirmed.
So here are three of my best photos of an Iris Borer Moth, taken September 2013. Enjoy!
Blessings,
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Dear Wanda,
Your excellent images of an Iris Borer Moth,
Macronoctua onusta, are a noteworthy addition to our archives as this represents a new species for our site.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae bore into iris plants and feed on the rhizomes”

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Wow, a new species for your archives! That’s fabulous!
This gorgeous moth I photographed was holding on to the base of an upright iris leaf so the moth was facing up (the pictures should be vertical rather than horizontal). I remember when I took the photo wondering how many people even get to see an adult Iris Borer Moth. People who want to grow iris are going to remove the larvae before they get to the pupae stage whenever possible, so the number of adults is not likely to be substantial. Then again, adult females can lay hundreds of eggs which keeps the population going …
I’m glad I could help your archives grow, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Thanks Wanda,
We rotated the images because all images on our site are horizontal, and to orient them vertically, we would have had to reduce the magnification.

Gotcha …

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Identification
Location: Oklahoma, USA
September 24, 2016 11:51 pm
My son has these in his garden. What are they?
Signature: BPWO

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Dear BPWO,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Many times immature insects have a different diet than the adults, but not so with the Caterpillar Hunters.  Both larvae and adults ravenously feed on Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapilars
Location: France
September 25, 2016 2:35 am
Saw this South of France, Gorges dHeric.Can’t seem to find it in a general search any ideas?
Signature: Jules

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jules,
Though your image does not illustrate the caudal horn, one of the most significant physical features of the Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles euphorbiae, the coloration is unmistakable.  The Spurge Hawkmoth  is found in North America as well as Eurasia, because they were released to help control the invasive spurge plants that have become naturalized in North America.   The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site has some excellent images that should substantiate our identification.

Thank you for clearing that up.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Great Golden Digger Wasp
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 24, 2016 11:36 am
Greeting, Awesome WTB Volunteers!
Here’s the photos of the Great Golden Digger Wasp I promised to send. I took these photos that same summer, August 2013, as the Great Black Wasp photos. I did see them both at the same time in my Rain Garden, though never close enough to get them in the same photo!
The detail fascinates me in these photos! The abdomen appears “furrier” than on the Great Black, the mouth pieces are more noticeable, and the legs spikes are definitely prominent. (Yes, I know, I’m using non-scientific jargon; as the saying goes, “I’m not a scientist …”).
Hope these photos help enhance your archives. They are indeed gorgeous gentle giants!
Blessings,
Wanda
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Wanda,
We are so thrilled you have solved your problem of submitting your images.  Since they started coming through a few days ago, you have provided our archives with such excellent images.  They are high resolution, perfectly focused and marvelously composed.  These Great Golden Digger Wasp images are amazing.  It is interesting that you are visually comparing the Great Golden Digger Wasp,
Sphex ichneumoneus, to the Great Black Wasp, Sphex pensylvanicus, because they are members of the same genus.

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Greetings, Daniel!
I’m glad the issue re: sending images is resolved as well. I have photos of several insects I’ve identified through various resources, and many of those might be beneficial additions to your archives. Then I have countless more photos of insects I still need help identifying with which I hope you can assist.
When I saw the Great Golden Digger Wasp I had already seen the Great Black Wasp so my first thought was how similar they were. Having identified the Great Black, I knew where to look for the identification for the Great Golden Digger Wasp. I do enjoy learning and remembering various resources to use as tools. In the case of these two Great Wasps, I had a book I borrowed from the library and the pictures provided the identification. I think you know one of the authors of that book, a Mr. Eric R. Eaton. I believe he provided additional insight into the identification for my Long-Horned Bee submission earlier this summer.
Speaking of which, I think I might have a photo of the male Long-Horned Bee. I’ll take another look to see if the antennae are longer than on the female.
I’ll cull through my photos to see what else I’ve identified that you might be able to add to your growing archives. And of course what I need help identifying.
Blessings to one and all!
Wanda

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify an insect
Location: bahrain
September 21, 2016 9:59 pm
Want to know the name and what should do if bite ?
Signature: nilmi

Paper Wasps

Arabian Paper Wasps

Dear Nilmi,
These are Wasps, and we believe they may be Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes.  Paper Wasps are social wasps, and though they are not aggressive, they might sting if their nest is disturbed.  If you are prone to allergic reactions, you may need to see a physician, but for most people, a sting will cause nothing more than local swelling and sensitivity.  We believe because of the bright yellow color, your Paper Wasps might be Polistes wattii which is pictured on both pBase and BirdsoMan where it is identified as the Arabian Paper Wasp.  Your image is awesome.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Diminutive Colorful Beetle from the Pacific Northwest
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 22, 2016 1:56 pm
It was a partly cloudy and 67° day when I noticed this colorful beetle moving around nervously on a hibiscus shrub. Its dimensions were about those of a mid to large sized ladybug and an unusually colorful insect for the Portland, Oregon area Thanks for any help you can provide in identifying it and for your wonderful website!
Signature: David

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is not a beetle.  It is a another Stink Bug nymph, and based on this BugGuide image, we have determined it is a Green Stink Bug nymph,
Chinavia hilaris.  Here is another image on the Journey to the Center blog.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your identification. No wonder I couldn’t find a photo of it — I was looking in the wrong order entirely. I need to start thinking “could it be a nymph?” when I see an unknown insect. The nymph is so snazzy and jewellike, but the adult rather ordinary looking. I’ll try not to “bug” you for a while.
Thanks again,
David

No problem David.  Whenever you get an image of something that you don’t recognize, feel free to send it our way and we will do our best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination