From the monthly archives: "September 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black bug with horns on its butt
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
September 25, 2016 7:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
I was changing the sheets on my bed and found this little bug (I took it outside). It looks harmless other than the little horns on its back, but my wife and I often wake up with inexplicable bug-bite looking things on us. What is this bug? Thanks for your help!
Signature: Julian

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Dear Julian,
This is an early instar Smoky Brown Cockroach nymph,
Periplaneta fuliginosa, which you may verify by comparing your images to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Early instars are black insects with characteristic white markings on the distal antenae, proximal antennae, thorax and abdomen.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede baby?
Location: Nevada
September 25, 2016 4:29 am
I found this little guy crawling up my leg I live in Reno NV
Signature: Miss mack

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Dear Miss Mack,
This is the predatory larva of a harmless Snakefly, and this image from BugGuide is a nice comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green with Red Abdomen grasshopper?
Location: Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains (Alpine County)
September 25, 2016 3:18 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I found this grasshopper-like insect in my house in the Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains this weekend and can’t identify it. The night before I found it, it was making such a loud noise (like a high-pitched humming) that I unplugged the refrigerator to see if it was the refrigerator on the blink that was making the noise!
Can you help me track down what this little critter is? I caught him in a glass (I was kind of skittish to catch him by hand, that looks like a stinger on his hind end!) and released him outside.
Thanks!
Signature: Nona Y.

Shield-Backed Katydid

Shield-Backed Katydid

Dear Nona,
This is not a Grasshopper.  Grasshoppers have much shorter antennae.  This is a Katydid, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Shield-Backed Katydid from the genus
Idiostatus based on this BugGuide image.  There is another image on the University of Florida Entomology page that is identified as the Unarmed Shieldback, Idiostatus inermis, that looks very similar.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually the ovipositor of the female and it poses no threat to humans, but large Shield-Backed Katydids might bite.

Hello, Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick reply to my query! So it is a Katydid! I’ve never seen one there before. But I appreciate your help!
Bests,
Nona

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Caterpillar with Red-Tipped Scales
Location: Southwest Texas (Val Verde County)
September 23, 2016 7:29 am
The following caterpillar was found on a nature trail at the Amistad National Recreation area in Del Rio, Texas (a semi-arid environment in Southwest Texas with influences by the Chihuahuan desert, Edwards plateau, and South Texas plains). The creature was found in the morning (~10 am) in September. It is predominately green in color, with a darker olive green dorsal side and lighter green belly. It appears to have 10 segments. Each of the first two segments behind the head has 4 green spine-like structures on the dorsal side (two per side). Most of the following segments had 4 scale-like spines that were predominately white with red tips. The head was predominately green with two yellow-ish vertical stripes. A dark green postabdominal spine was located on the dorsal side of the 10th segment.
Signature: n/a

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Dear n/a,
This is a Silkmoth Caterpillar from the genus
Sphingicampa, and there are several similar looking species found in Texas, according to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Hanover PA
September 24, 2016 4:21 am
Hi. I just found this “thing” on the side of my house. I live in Hanover, PA and was wondering if you can tell me what in the world it is!
Signature: Gayle

Tolype

Tolype

Dear Gayle,
This is a Lappet Moth in the genus
Tolype.  According to BugGuide:  “there is considerable variation among individuals and between the sexes of all Tolype species, which complicates identification of species based on color.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth like Bug
Location: Dallas Texas
September 24, 2016 5:02 pm
Hello! For a few weeks now I have seen these moth like bugs in my house! At first I thought it was just from us in and out the door when the porch light was on or the garage door was open. However, now I know that there is some type of issue. Back in March I had a 60 lb bees honey comb removed from in between my bedroom floor and the bottom level of the house, my son’s bedroom ceiling. Is it a termite, a moth in my grains, larva for another bug? Please be so kind to give me your expertise and advice.
Warmest,
Signature: Tiffiney

Indian Meal Moth

Indian Meal Moth

Dear Tiffiney,
It is time to clean out the pantry.  This is an Indian Meal Moth, a species that infests stored grain products like oatmeal and cornmeal that were left on the shelf too long.  They will also infest stored nuts and spices.

Daniel,
Thank you so much. Last night I finally seen some in the top of the pantry. I had read that they can be attracted to grains. I had some old cornmeal I never used that has been there for over a year on the top shelf. I so appreciate you responding and your expertise! I love your website and I would love to blog about it soon.
warmest and thank you so much,
Tiffiney

Cornmeal is one of their favorites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination