From the monthly archives: "September 2016"

Subject: unknown stool parasite
Location: CHicago
September 1, 2016 11:04 am
I am producing what may be (by usage of only hand lens) are Charcot-Leyden crystals, my reservation is that I believe I remember them much more uniform in shape. If I remember from my education in prehistoric times and if they are in the stool – they are associated with eosinophil breakdown in feces as a consequence of parasitic disease.
They appear very dark rust colored when cleaned up. I remember when stained in the lab with trichrome (sp? its been a long time) fecal preparation they turned bright red.
Literally hundreds are evacuating from me – and because of their shape are quite painful. Please assist
Signature: E Miller

Stool Sample Findings

Stool Sample Findings

Dear E Miller,
We regret to inform you that we do not have the necessary qualifications to identify your findings, and we would urge you to see a specialist in internal parasites or a gastrointestinal specialist.

Things Found in Stool Sample

Things Found in Stool Sample

Subject: Wolf spider with babies
Location:  Unknown
September 1, 2016 9:20 am
I just want to tell you how much I love you guys. I’m a biology student and though bugs aren’t on my love list the photos and stories I’ve read have really brought me around. I’ve included footage of a wolf spider with back babies being released by me in a field (my “website” link). I hope you can use it on your site, or at least find enjoyment in it. Keep up the great work!
Website: https://youtu.be/5ekYQ2O5Hlw
Signature: Jennifer

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Jennifer,
We are including a screen shot of your Wolf Spider with her spiderlings vidoe in our posting and we are linking to your video.  We are also tagging you with the Bug Humanitarian Award for releasing this Wolf Spider back into the wild.  Wolf Spiders are the only spiders that carry their young about, though this behavior is found in other arachnids including Scorpions.  Can you please provide us with a location for your sighting?

Awesome! I didn’t know that about the scorpions, it’s great to know.
This spider was found in Cape Coral, Florida. The wildlife down here is absolutely amazing, everywhere you look there’s something crawling about. I’m so honored that you liked my video.
Thanks!

Subject: RE: centipede in stool??
Location: Houston, TX
September 1, 2016 8:10 am
Hi, I am hoping that you can give me some insight into this matter. My husband has had diarrhea for about a week now. He went to the doctor, and we are waiting for results from his stool sample. This morning, he had an accident in his pants, and we found this worm that doesn’t resemble any of the more common intestinal parasites. I searched the internet, and found a post from Feb. 2013 titled “Can Centipedes really crawl up your butt??” The culprit resembles the picture in the post, so I am wondering what the final findings were. Thanks.
Signature: concerned wife

Centipede found in husband's messy underwear

Centipede found in husband’s messy pants.

Dear concerned wife,
We invested much research into the posting you cited:  Can Centipedes really crawl up your butt??  What we find troubling about your submission is that your Centipede does not look like a Soil Centipede, the group that was the subject of all our research as well as other strange reports we have received including Soil Centipede presumably passed during bowel movement and Soil Centipede found in Bath WaterBugGuide also has a submission of a Soil Centipede found in a human stool sample.  Soil Centipedes are described on BugGuide as being:  “Slender, rather sluggish eyeless centipedes that have 27 to 191 pairs (the number of leg pairs is always odd) of legs and 14-segmented antennae. They burrow in the substrate in a manner similar to earthworms, by elongating and contracting their bodies.”  If our calculations are correct, your Centipede has fewer than 21 pairs of legs, so it is NOT a Soil Centipede.  Additionally, your Centipede does not appear like it has been in a human gastrointestinal tract.  Your Centipede appears like it might be in the genus
Cryptops, based on this imaged of Crytops hortensis which is posted to BugGuide and appears to have the same number of legs as your individual.  We also have a posting on our site of a Tiger Centipede found in a young lady’s panties, and it was definitely NOT a parasite.  We suspect it just sought out a warm dark place, which is what we are inclined to believe regarding the Centipede you found.  We would urge you to keep the specimen and take it to the doctor conducting the stool sample, but again, we are inclined to believe the two instances are a coincidence and that your husband’s diarrhea is not related to the discovery of the Centipede in his dirtied pants.  Please keep us posted if there are additional developments or questions.

Subject: Grasshoppers?
Location: Eastern Iowa
August 31, 2016 12:37 pm
I was wondering if you could help me identify which type of grasshoppers these are. Eastern Iowa, Johnson County parking lot in Iowa City on 8/29/2016.
Thank you!
Signature: des

Band-Winged Grasshoppers

Band-Winged Grasshoppers

Dear Des,
These are Band-Winged Grasshoppers in the subfamily Oedipodinae, and as you can see by browsing BugGuide, there are many species in the subfamily.  Band-Winged Grasshoppers get their common name which is descriptive of the underwings, that are hidden in your image.  The underwings are often brightly colored (red, orange, yellow and blue depending upon the species) with black bands.  When the grasshoppers fly, they attract attention because of the bright colors, but when they land, as in your image, they are camouflaged by the drab colors that hide the underwings.  Unfortunately, we cannot provide you with a species name at this time.

Subject: Disgusting looking critters…please help identify
Location: Melbourne, Laverton VIC footpath into Laverton P12 College
September 2, 2016 3:06 am
Was walking along Bladin Rd Melbourne VIC and saw this ‘clump’ just on footpath leading into Laverton College. A staff who has been there for last 27years said they are caterpillars but i am still curious if they really are caterpollars. Apparently they seemed to have come from the eucalypt tree near footpath.
Signature: Curious

Spitfires

Spitfires

Dear Curious,
These are Spitfires, a name used in Australia for the larvae of Sawflies, non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps whose larvae are often confused with caterpillars.  Based on the image used on the Australian Museum site, they may be Steel Blue Sawflies in the genus
Perga, and the site states:  “Steel-blue Sawfly larvae in the Sydney area feed on eucalypts.”

Subject: Unusual insect
Location: Toronto, Canada
September 2, 2016 12:27 pm
Hi there. I found this in my yard in Toronto, Canada on September 2nd. We’ve nevet seen anything like it.
Signature: Elena

Banded Orbweaver

Banded Orbweaver

Dear Elena,
This is a Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, a member of a family of spiders that is considered harmless, though a large individual might bite if carelessly handled.  Orbweavers rarely leave the security of their webs.  For the record, spiders are NOT insects.

Thank you for your reply, Daniel.
I am aware that spiders are not insects, but the one that we have here has 6 legs not 8 and the markings are entirely different.
Elena

Hello again Elena,
Please inspect your blurry image more closely, and you will see that the front two pairs of legs are being held together in a manner often employed by Orbweavers while hanging in the web, as depicted in this BugGuide image.  What is most unusual regarding your blurry image is that your individual is not hanging up-side-down, which is the typical position used by Orbweavers perched in the middle of their webs while awaiting prey.  Please note that the final link we provided is to a Silver Orbweaver, a southern species not found in Canada.  In Canada, you have both Banded Orbweavers and Golden Orbweavers.