From the monthly archives: "August 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify this caterpillar
Location: Cranberry Portage, Manitoba
August 25, 2016 7:05 pm
My husband took this photo of a caterpillar in Cranberry Portage, Manitoba. I’m not sure if its a type of Tussock Caterpillar. Wondering what type of caterpillar and if you have a photo of the moth or butterfly it will turn into. This photo was taken in August 2016. Thank you 🙂
Signature: Wildlife Lover

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Dear Wildlife Lover,
We are certain your caterpillar is that of the Fingered Dagger Moth,
Acronicta dactylina, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on alder, birch, poplar, hawthorn, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rustic Sphinx Invasion?
August 25, 2016 6:35 pm
Hello there!
Thanks for having such an awesome and informative site, first of all!
Because of your site, I now know that the massive, palm-sized moths that seem to be taking over my front house neighbor’s home are in fact the Manduca rustica, or “Rustic Sphinx” moth.
However, knowing this about these magnificent moonlight-nectar-drinking creatures is unfortunately not enough. She’s quite set on having them OUT of her house and really I can’t blame her. In the past 2 days she’s found 4 of them! I was nearly convinced she’d just been encountering the same moth again and again except, after capturing one to relocate to a local nature preserve, I noticed a second one within short range of the first.
So, my question is:  How do you suppose would be best to deter them from coming in, or encourage them to leave?
I wouldn’t want to harm them, I definitely appreciate their existence as validation that our shared yard is a tiny oasis ecosystem…. But when you find them in your kitchen sink you start to wonder how far the ecosystem should spread.
Thank you for your time,
Janey
Phoenix, AZ
Signature: Janey

Rustic Sphinx (image from our archives)

Rustic Sphinx (image from our archives)

Dear Janey,
We wish you had supplied an image with your comment, but luckily we have no shortage of Rustic Sphinx images in our archives.  We would recommend two control methods for your neighbor.  We strongly suspect that outdoor lighting is attracting the moths, so keeping the porch light turned off, or having it on a motion activation sensor should help reduce the number of Rustic Sphinxes attracted to the home.  This is a large moth, and it must be gaining access to the home through gaps in the doors or windows, so using caulking to seal the gaps will also reduce the chances of critters getting inside.  Finally, we suspect this is an unusual seasonal event, perhaps due to ideal weather and other environmental conditions.  We believe this will pass within a month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camouflage Looper?
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
August 25, 2016 10:43 pm
Hi — Love your site — thanks for all your work. I found this little guy while I was taking photos at a pond near Tulsa, OK, a few weeks ago. At first I couldn’t figure out what it was because it was in the pink tufts of the flower. But then, I used a blade of grass to coax it out on to a leaf. Once it stretched out, I could see it was an inchworm. I’d never seen one like this before!!
Do you know if the “camouflage” bits get stuck on passively as the inchworm crawls around, or does the worm actively attach them?
Thanks,
Signature: Terrie

Camouflaged Looper

Camouflaged Looper

Dear Terrie,
Thanks for the compliment and thanks for sending in your awesome images of a Camouflaged Looper,
Synchlora aerata, or another member of the genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar adorns its body with plant fragments, usually flower petals, to camouflage it as it feeds. It is the only widespread species to do so(2), but from Maryland southwards other Synchlora spp. are also present and only raising to adulthood can yield a definite caterpillar ID.”  We suspect the caterpillar uses silk to attach the flower bits to its body.

Camouflaged Looper

Camouflaged Looper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Hillsborough County, Florida
August 28, 2016 5:26 am
I have looked at all the black and white beetles and cannot find one that looks quite like this. It was on dog fennel in west central Florida. I would like to know what it is and if it is native. It looks like it is missing an antennae.
Thank you for this wonderful reference site.
Signature: Donna Bollenbach

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Donna,
This looks to us like a Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009; map), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also indicates it is  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops: larvae often girdle the taproot, which may kill the plant and provide an avenue for Phythophora infections. A single larva can kill young hosts while several larvae can cause serious decline of older, established hosts.”

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant issue
Location: Austin tx
August 28, 2016 6:15 am
Hey ! I’ve had these ants come and go thru the summer more so during the high heat…they’re small but quite a few I can’t find where they are getting in from or what exactly it will take to get rid of them…I’ve tried spay and traps and gel they leave for a bit then come back thought you could help
Thanks
Signature: Rachel

Possibly Argentine Ant

Possibly Argentine Ant

Dear Rachel,
Your Ant looks and sounds like it might be the invasive Argentine Ant,
Linepithema humile, and even though BugGuide does not list any sightings in Texas, BugGuide does provide this range information:  “across southern United States (from North Carolina to Florida, west through the gulf states to the coast of California. The only limit to their range is freezing temperatures and lack of water.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Will often invade homes when weather outside is too cold, too wet or too dry, so may be more obvious at some times than others.”  Our Los Angeles office has been plagued by Argentine Ants for years, and we would love to find an eco-friendly means of control, and though we do not normally provide extermination advice, all bets are off when it comes to invasive species, and the Argentine Ant is at the top of the list of scourges we would like to eliminate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thought you might enjoy hangin out w/ this guy 😉
Location: Cahokia, IL
August 27, 2016 10:32 pm
Caught this little guy comin out of his shell. Looks like he’s already found a friend to hang with.
Signature: Jokerswylde

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis with Assassin Bug Observer

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis with Assassin Bug Observer

Dear Jokerswylde,
Thanks for sending us your image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  The observer is a predatory Assassin Bug.  Even though insects are especially vulnerable during and immediately after metamorphosis, we don’t believe there is any threat from the Assassin Bug which would normally prey upon smaller creatures.  Interestingly, both the Cicada and the Assassin Bug are classified together in the same insect order Hemiptera.

So this Cicada has a hired Assassin (Bug) for a bodyguard? lol Funnily enough, I was so focused on the Cicada that I didn’t even notice the other little guy when I first took the picture. & when I looked at the picture later, to post it, I thought it was just a common green grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination