From the monthly archives: "August 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug/Creature?
Location: Seaside Heights, NJ beach
August 1, 2016 4:55 pm
found a bunch of these washed up on shore from the ocean and was wondering what they are…
Signature: Karen

Shark or Ray Egg Case

Mermaid’s Purse

Dear Karen,
This is a Mermaid’s Purse, the egg case of a shark, skate or ray.  According to About Education:  “Perhaps you’ve found a “mermaid’s purse” on the beach. These mermaid’s purses blend in really well with seaweed, so you may also have walked right by one.   The enchantingly-named structures are the egg cases of skates and some sharks. While some sharks bear live young, some sharks (and all skates) release their embryos in leathery egg cases that have horns and sometimes long tendrils at each corner. The tendrils allow them to anchor to seaweeds or other substrates. Each egg case contains one embryo. The case is made up of a material that is a combination of collagen and keratin, so a dried egg case feels similar to a fingernail. ”  According to British Marine Life Study Society:  “Regular rockpoolers are likely to have come across ‘Mermaid’s Purses’, containing the eggs or young of the Lesser-spotted Dogfish,
Scyliorhinus canicula, lying amongst the debris on the tideline. These egg capsules that have been dislodged after being laid by the adult female dogfish are doomed to perish. Some, if not most, of the capsules are empty. However, on many occasions I have found a live embryo inside, some of them nearly ready to break free from the capsule. ”  According to Shark Trust:  “Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature shark, skate or ray. Once empty, the eggcases often wash ashore and can be found among the strandline on beaches.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying fly eater
Location: Central Connecticut
August 1, 2016 10:42 am
Saw this guy on a fencepost in central Connecticut. Curious about the ID. Thanks
Signature: Bug watcher

Robber Fly eats Blow Fly

Robber Fly eats Blow Fly

Dear Bug Watcher,
The predator in your image is a Robber Fly, but we are not certain of the genus.  We will attempt to research its identity further.  The prey appears to be a Blow Fly, perhaps a Green Bottle Fly or some other member of the genus
Lucilia, a group that is well documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dinosaur looking bug
Location: Kettering OH
July 31, 2016 3:46 pm
Saw this bug in a grassy field in Dayton Oh where we had a birthday party at the playground for my daughter today (july31). Although it hung close to the picnic tables and bath house.
It had an interesting shaped head – dinosaur-ish and had a metallic bronze colored patch on its lower body. It had a weird vertical pincher kind of mouth and was watch me intently it seemed.
Never seen anything like it!
Signature: Curious Mom in Dayton

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Curious Mom in Dayton,
Nine times out of ten when we get an identification request from North America that includes the words “dinosaur” or “prehistoric” in the subject line, the critter involved is a Wheel Bug.  Like other Assassin Bugs, Wheel Bugs are predators, and though they are not aggressive toward humans, they should be handled with extreme caution as they are quite capable of inflicting a painful, but not dangerous bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oak Tree Beetle
Location: Foothills east of Sacramento, Ca
August 1, 2016 7:11 am
I live in Northern California in the Sierra foothills. We recently had a large, established oak tree die. I noticed a couple nodes at the base that I was able to break off. I found an infestation of black and orange beetles. Trying to figure what they are, if they killed the tree or if they just move in after the tree is dead/dying. And what to do to make sure they don’t spread to our other trees.
Signature: Thank you, Ian

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Dear Ian,
These are Pleasing Fungus Beetles, probably
Megalodacne fasciata, and they are not responsible for the death of your oak tree, however, their presence is tied to the health of the tree.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae and adults feed on the fruiting bodies of fungi growing in decaying wood.”  So, as the tree began to die, it was invaded by the fungus and the fungus attracted the Pleasing Fungus Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange fly in resort
Location: Florida
August 1, 2016 6:24 am
We are in Orlando, Fl and we found this bug in our resort and my son is very interested in creepy crawlies much to my dismay and he would like to know what it is!
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Female Summer Fishfly

Female Summer Fishfly

Dear Doesn’t matter,
By comparing your image to this BugGuide image, you can see you have submitted an image of a Summer Fishfly,
Chauliodes pectinicornis. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: Northern Kentucky
July 31, 2016 6:10 pm
Just wondering what this is the kids found it on our property.
Signature: Fun in ky

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Fun in ky,
Though there are several other large green moths native to North America, including the Pandorus Sphinx and the Pacific Green Sphinx, nothing looks remotely similar to the Luna Moth.  Other continents have relatives of the Luna Moth, including the Indian Moon Moth, but again, there is nothing else in North America that looks anything like this beautiful creature.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination