From the monthly archives: "August 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green and black beetle
Location: Lincolnshire UK
August 29, 2016 7:59 am
We found this 4″ specimen (unfortunately dead) under a stone near a small lake in the East Midland part of the U.K. Unlike anything we have ever seen before in this country and much bigger. I have searched the Internet but cannot find what this monster is called!
Signature: Don’t mind

Toy Beetle

Toy Beetle

Dear Don’t Mind,
Try though we might, we were unable to find a rubber or plastic beetle that exactly resembled your discovery, though we did find many lifelike looking insect toys online.  We were much luckier with this Giant Cave “Spider” found in Austin Texas by a group of partiers.  Just out of curiosity, have the Brits switched from metric to inches in measurement?

Hi Daniel
Thanks for your great reply (it made me laugh).   I managed to find a UK WEBSITE and they asked if I had checked whether or not it was plastic too!  On closer inspection of the photo it became quite clear that it was plastic.  Sorry for wasting time.  But thanks from over the pond!  And no we are still metric, although I sometimes tend to be ‘old school’!
Regards
Steve Twigg

Hi Steve,
It was not a waste of time.  We really did search for quite some time to attempt locating your exact toy beetle online.  We love amusing postings like your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t identify this caterpillar
Location: Athens Georgia
August 28, 2016 10:07 pm
Ok so I have spent about an hour and a half trying to I this caterpillar and the closest thing I can find is an orange striped oak worm BUT this is not orange, has a tighter paternity and is smoother. The top lines are white and turn yellow towards the legs. It has one set of horns and multiple small pounds on its tail. Also it has a red marking on both sides of the tail at the bottom near legs. These things are devouring my maple tree and have turned the concrete on my patio black
Signature: Tony Bowers

Green Striped Mapleworm

Green Striped Mapleworm

Dear Tony,
We found an image of a Green Striped Mapleworm on the Post and Courier website, and we then researched that on BugGuide where we learned this is the caterpillar of the lovely Rosy Maple Moth,
Dryocampa rubicunda.  According to the Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 77:  “The green-striped mapleworm (Anisota rubicunda (Fab.) ), a native of North America, is distributed widely throughout the eastern half of the United States and the southern parts of adjacent Canadian Provinces. Its southern range extends from the Carolina coast to the gulf coast in Alabama and Mississippi. It has been recorded as far west as Nebraska and Kansas.  The insect causes heavy defolia­tion throughout its range but is most destructive near its southwestern limits.”  You should note that the genus name is incorrect in the latter link.  Though we have numerous images of the adult Rosy Maple Moth on our site, we believe this may be a first for the Green Striped Mapleworm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Worm
Location: Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
August 29, 2016 5:46 am
I saw this huhe worm in the park in the Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo Dominican Republic. It was about the length of my large hand and a bout as fat as my fat thumb. It also had a decent weight to it. I moved t under a tree so it would be some what safe. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Dominican Gringa

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dominican Gringa,
This impressive caterpillar is a Fig Sphinx Caterpillar,
Pachylia ficus , a species that can be quite variable in coloration.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas “Larvae pupate in cocoons spun amongst leaf litter” and finding it on the ground indicates it is probably seeking an appropriate location to begin metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Headed Bush Cricket
Location: Mount Holly, NC
August 27, 2016 8:20 pm
If you would like to use my up-close photo of the Red Headed Bush Cricket, you are more than welcome. I found this cricket in my backyard, and it was the first time I had ever seen one – handsome little thing! Before I found out what is was called, I had nicknamed it the Darth Maul Cricket!
Regards,
Signature: Jeff Eppinette

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Dear Jeff,
We are really excited to post your lovely image of a Red Headed Bush Cricket or Handsome Trig.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green caterpillar
Location: Brentwood Bay, south Vancouver Island
August 24, 2016 7:28 pm
This green beauty is about 3 inches long.
Just happened to see it on japanese maple.
We dont know how long it been there….August 24, 2016
Signature: R Laird

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear R Laird,
This magnificent caterpillar is a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar, one of the Giant Silkmoths.  It is the most wide ranging North American species, and it is reported from all 48 continental United States as well as much of Canada.  The adult Polyphemus Moth is one of the species with eyespots on the underwings that have evolved to fool predators into perceiving a much larger, and potentially threatening creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful unknown bug
Location: Northeast ohio berea
August 25, 2016 1:42 pm
Dear bugman,
Today i found this very beautiful bug but i have no idea what it is. It had a pink head that faded into its body. I had a dark purpleish double diamond on its back. Across its body it had a scale like pattern. The legs were yellow and kind of clear. It had two very long feelers. It had short things the curled inward where the mouth would be. It flew away with two sets of wings that were white and they were the shape of a our fingertips. Lastly o noticed it had a long black stinger like hing on its underside. Anyway i am a very nature loveing person and i have never seen anything quite like this before so if you have any idea of what this is i would truly love to know. Its driving me crazy! Thank you for any and all help mr. Bugman. I really appreciate it.
Signature: Sam ferrell

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Sam,
When the word “beautiful” is in the subject line, we can’t help but to open the request long before we open inquiries with subject lines that indicate people want extermination advice.  This beauty is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata.  Both the markings and the presence of an ovipositor, which you mistook for a stinger, identify your individual as a female of this sexually dimorphic species.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of vegetation including (but not restricted to): Grapevine, Sunflower, Maple Tree, White Pine Tree, Apple Tree, Post Oak Tree. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees” and “Males sing mostly at night: a 10-second trill followed by several seconds of silence, then a trill again. After mating, male hangs downward from foliage, allowing female to hang on beneath and dine on secretions from his thorax .”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination